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40 Ways to Get Banned From the Top 5 Social Networks


#1

Hi my name is Bran and I am a new seller here on Fiverr. Recently came across an article that is relevant to people who set up social media accounts for others. Today I realized that I had to change how I did things to stay Kosher and not get myself or my customers social media accounts banned! I am sharing part of the article here. If you put the title of this article into Google, you will find the web page, so you can read the article in full depth. Those who offer social media service will find what can get you banned interesting:

It may feel like a fustercluck, but there are actually some rules and regulations that go along with participating in social media. Not the kind that ban people from uploading pictures of their meals (PB&J no crust today guys! #omgsohungry), but the ones that help alleviate things like spamming, bad content, and a poor community experience. You know, the things that help make social media a nice place to be.



It’s not a perfect system the social networks have worked out, but it’s important for marketers to know – because believe it or not, lots of marketers are breaking these rules and don’t even know it. And it breaks our hearts to see marketers giving an honest go of social media get banned from the networks … and then not even know why the heck it happened.



This post will review the policies the most popular social networks have set up – some more stringent than others – that we think you should be aware of. And we tried to put them in plain English, too, devoid of confusing and boring legal babble. If you’re accidentally breaking any of these rules, at least now you can put the kibosh on your illicit activities before it’s too late!



How Marketers Can Get Banned From Twitter

The full list of Twitter “rules” can be found here: The Twitter Rules. Aptly named, eh? Here are the ones that are most likely to apply to marketers so you don’t get banned by that sweet little tweety bird:


  1. Impersonating others. If you’re impersonating others in an attempt to mislead other Twitter users, Twitter will not be happy. That means no pretending to be a competitor – that’s a low blow move, anyway.


  2. Snagging trademarked usernames. Another sketchy move is trying to grab your competitor’s username. If they’ve trademarked the name, Twitter will reclaim it from you on their behalf. Twitter will also suspend you if you’re using trademarked logos on your profile.


  3. Squatting on handles. Ow, that sounds uncomfortable. This means you can’t grab a Twitter username and not use it. Well, you can, but Twitter will just grab it right back if it remains inactive after 6 months. On a related note, you can’t grab a username for the purposes of selling it.


  4. Buying or selling Twitter usernames. There can be no transactions made around Twitter usernames at all. The penalty is possible permanent suspension from Twitter – for buyers and sellers.
  5. Posting the same thing over and over. If you’re trying to get a tweet visibility, you can’t do it by tweeting it like a maniac, particularly if it’s duplicate content tweeted at specific users. Same goes for links – Twitter will penalize you if they see you tweeting the same link over, and over, and over … and over.


  6. Following people like a bot would. That means you shouldn’t use a bot to manage your following and unfollowing, nor should you act like a bot when manually following and unfollowing people. Aggressive follow and unfollow behavior – particularly seeing a large amount of people followed and/or unfollowed in a short period of time – will signal to Twitter that something’s amiss.


  7. Getting followers in sketchy ways. Specifically, those “get followers fast!” schemes. It may get you permanently banned from Twitter.



    How Marketers Can Get Banned From Facebook



    We’ve all probably participated in our fair share of complaining about leaving Facebook. But could they force marketers to leave? Maybe, if they start doing any of these things that violate the Facebook Page Guidelines:


  8. Creating fake accounts. As Forrest Gump said, “That’s all I have to say about that.”


  9. Using bots or scrapers. Well, almost. Facebook says you can’t use them “without our prior permission.” Which basically means no using bots or scrapers … if you had permission, you’d know it.


  10. Posting copyrighted content. You’ve heard this one a bunch of times in this blog post, and if you do it a bunch of times on Facebook, they have the right to disable your account.
  11. Collecting user data incorrectly. What does that mean, exactly? It means you have to clearly state that it’s your business, not Facebook, collecting their information, and you will obtain their consent before using their data in any way.


  12. Including calls-to-action in your cover photo. This includes promotions or discounts, requests to ‘Like’ or share your photo, contact information for your business, or generic CTAs like "Tell a Friend."

    Have you unwittingly broken any of these social media rules? Have we missed any that you think marketers should know about?