Advice from a 500+ Buyer


#1

Well, I just celebrated my 500th purchase. For me, Fiverr has become an effective mechanism to help me market my small business. While there’s lots of tips for sellers, here’s my top-10 for buyers:



#1) Don’t expect miracles. No matter what the description says, nobody is going to build an entire website, do a full production commercial, or write a full and expert-level article. Certainly, some sellers describe their gig with the slick marketing language of a real-estate ad, but no matter what you read, stay realistic. After Fiverr takes its cut, the seller has a small amount of money (time) to work with.



#2) Ask questions before ordering. Want to irritate a seller? Buy the gig first, and then ask all of the pertinent questions after.



#3) Provide an opportunity to rectify. These sellers live and die on their feedback, so be sensitive to that. If a seller didn’t deliver as promised, clearly state the issue and provide one good-faith effort to make right (most sellers will do so). Don’t leave negative feedback as part of an emotional reaction.



#4) Be prompt. Don’t order a gig, and then sit on it, not providing the needed details for the seller to get started.



#5) Be specific. Think of yourself as the executive chef, and the seller as the sous-chef. It’s your job to compose the recipe, and then then sous-chef actually crafts the product from the recipe you specified.



#6) Leave feedback promptly. For good feedback, it’s like applause to a musician.



#7) Don’t cancel - it hurts their ratio. One time, I bought a gig, and then wasn’t able to deliver the material, so I cancelled the gig. Then, I saw how the cancellation automatically left negative feedback. I still feel bad about that one.



#8) Don’t trust the flags. Whenever you see the nationality flag, that seems to be more of a suggestion than a rule. I’ve chatted with sellers with US and Canadian flags, masked as sellers in Pakistan and India.



#9) Make sure you understand the release rights. When someone creates an image, video, or sound file, do they still own copyrights to it, and are just licensing it to you, or do you own it?



#10) Understand how popular your model is. For instance, I’ve seen the same pretty YouTube model providing reviews for plumbers, skin care products, trip recommendations, BBQ sauce, and so on. So, using that same model for your review…well, isn’t exactly going to come off as totally authentic.



Bonus #11) Be creative! Some of these gigs are really innovative and fun. I’ve gotten custom love songs written, my message displayed all over the world, mock Marilyn Monroe breathlessly singing me happy birthday, and so on. For a measly $5, it’s one hell of a hoot!



Sheriff’s Note: This post is very helpful and some good comments and kind thank-you’s have been posted throughout. No further responses are needed so this thread is now closed. Good luck with your purchases and sales!


#2

Hope every buyer follows this…


#3

I hope all buyers are like you! Thanks for this good post.


#4

Reply to @geordievoice: I should add it is me that cancels the gigs if they are not suitable, not the buyers. I can’t have dodgy companies selling strange potions, bizarre dating sites, spam marketing etc on my press release website.


#5

Some great tips there that as a seller I agree with. However, I would add please READ THE GIG before sending questions. I often get questions from people who quite clearly have not read the gig description as all the info is there, but they have just skim read it. Answering Q’s takes up time and when you are getting paid $4 per gig every second counts!



Good advice about sending info first if you are not sure as I get cancellations from people who provide press releases that are either unsuitable content or that are not in a standard format ir with very bad spelling and grammar. (My service is creating SEO press pages out of provided press releases)



Another tip would be to go for a gig extra or two. I think it is often a false economy to go for the basic $5 gig as with a gig extra or two the overall gig can be so much better and worthwhile. For example with my press release pages they look so much better with a photo, they bring the pages alive and readers can instantly see what the release is about. I had one customer recently, a nice customer and provided a great release. It was from a lap top manufacturer and the lap top was so stylish, but they did not select the gig extra for an image of the product the release was about. For the sake of $5 I think they really did not get the best from the gig, as a pic of the product would have made their product based press release page so much better.


#6

Reply to @geordievoice: I should add it is me that cancels the gigs if they are not suitable, not the buyers. I can’t have dodgy companies selling strange potions, bizarre dating sites, spam marketing etc on my press release website.


#7

Some great tips there that as a seller I agree with. However, I would add please READ THE GIG before sending questions. I often get questions from people who quite clearly have not read the gig description as all the info is there, but they have just skim read it. Answering Q’s takes up time and when you are getting paid $4 per gig every second counts!



Good advice about sending info first if you are not sure as I get cancellations from people who provide press releases that are either unsuitable content or that are not in a standard format ir with very bad spelling and grammar. (My service is creating SEO press pages out of provided press releases)



Another tip would be to go for a gig extra or two. I think it is often a false economy to go for the basic $5 gig as with a gig extra or two the overall gig can be so much better and worthwhile. For example with my press release pages they look so much better with a photo, they bring the pages alive and readers can instantly see what the release is about. I had one customer recently, a nice customer and provided a great release. It was from a lap top manufacturer and the lap top was so stylish, but they did not select the gig extra for an image of the product the release was about. For the sake of $5 I think they really did not get the best from the gig, as a pic of the product would have made their product based press release page so much better.


#8

Excellent article for buyers written with the interests of both the seller and buyer in mind. Communication is absolute key and the more communication that sellers promote the more I would trust them. You can of course inbox the seller before committing to buying a gig - and a lot of my sales happen this way.



Good luck and enjoy the array of talent on offer.


#9

Reply to @nivvie: Thanks, Alhamdullah :slight_smile:


#10

Hey! Please check my service! :slight_smile: https://www.fiverr.com/playstore_ :stuck_out_tongue: :stuck_out_tongue: :stuck_out_tongue:


#11

Nice post for every one to pick up


#12

thanks. I love to work i fiverr. My voting service is rock :slight_smile:


#13

Congrats for you! Awesome tips, I hope I can find buyers like you! :slight_smile:


#14

@timmbbo

Thank you for a lucid and well thought out post. Wishing you continued success.


#15

If only every buyer was like you!


#16

From your fingers to every potential buyer out there… great list of what us sellers need from buyers!



Thanks for posting!



Juli


#17

Great post.


#18

Great post, good to see buyers here that know how Fiverr works !


#19

I think this should be in the email Fiverr sends when buyers first open their account. It’s great advice!


#20

I love this post!