Fiverr Forum

But you never asked for this


#1

You ever have a client that is threatening to cancel an order because you did not include something that he never once asked for?

Trust me, if I had ESP, I wouldn’t be on Fiverr.


#2

Yes, and I always cancel first. :slight_smile:

My bewilderment over someone honestly thinking that building a productive work relationship with threats or insults is a way to go is just too strong.

I’m resigned to the fact that people don’t read, this part is something I’ve just accepted. “I’ve seen it in a similar gig and I’ve assumed it’s included here” would be the most popular explanation.


#3

YUP happened with me couple of times to deal with them you can do 2 things

  1. if what buyer was asking is easy for you to do you can give some extras for customer satisfaction
  2. if its complex and taking a lot of work and time tell them truth and also tell them its cost for doing

or you can contact CS


#4

Why would the buyer think it was included?


#5

You mean like a 1,000-word article about cellulite removal which the buyer later says they need re-written to be all about their new fancy microwave machine which melts fat inside people?

Yes. And yes, the world is mad.


#6

I don’t even know. It was something he wanted included in the article, but never mentioned he wanted included. Confused the hell out of when when he was annoyed that I didn’t include it in the requirements or mentioned it in conversation.


#7

Exactly like that, to be honest.


#8

I don’t know what exactly did the buyer expect from you, but I’ve had a case where I asked a blogger to write an article about freelancing VS agency and they didn’t mention pricing at all. I didn’t cancel the order, but to me it was an obvious factor, but seller decided to focus on other things.

So my lesson was that I need to always mention the key talking points, purpose and angle.

I’m guessing you don’t get such cancellations often, but maybe next time you need to specifically ask what needs to be included our maybe even send the article outline in bullet points. (For smaller orders I guess it doesn’t make sense, but for bigger ones it could)

I’m not even trying to dissect this particular case. I’m just trying to provide buyer’s POV and come up with solutions that might come in handy for others reading it.


#9

In this case, charge for a full re-write. I don’t put up with this anymore. Now that the buyer has already decided to feel personally offended by your lack of ESP, they will likely leave a sub-par review, even if you completely re-edit their work FOC. - In this case, you have nothing to lose.


#10

Actually no, though I sometimes have clients who unveil important details (that might have made me quote a different price/turnaround) only in the requirements they send after already having accepted and paid the offer, which pretty much amounts to the same issue, albeit not requiring ESP, at least.

Does that usually happen to you with direct orders or custom offers too?


#11

I built this into my “requirements” form - I have a section that specifically says “Are there any key points or areas that you want this piece to cover.” I am not sure if it would work in all cases, but for some, it might be a helpful addition.


#12

I avoid this by sending the buyer a draft when i’m 50-75% finished to ask them if I’m going in the right direction, or if there’s anything that is unclear to them. This practice has definitely improved my content.

The type of situation you’re in is exactly why I try to get the buyer to look over my work throughout the process. It would be horrible to finish a job and find out I didn’t explain something the way they wanted, or failed to address a point that is important to them.

tbh, any gig I’ve ever done here or the work I did before I came to fiverr I’ve sought feedback multiple times throughout my process.


#13

I use this technique as well. In fact, on longer pieces (like white papers) I will create an outline before doing anything else, share that, then share a 70% - 80% completed draft. Definitely helps to manage expectations, and pick up on extra requirements.