Fiverr Forum

Did Anyone Learn To Read In Elementary School?


#1

My instructions are pretty simple and clear. I even listed them as 1…2…3…This is what I need from you and this is what you can expect from me. So what do I get? “I need a newsletter. Go to this website and make me a newsletter” and the timer starts. Duh! It turns out to be a website for some tech stuff and I have no idea! What do you write about electric equipment? And it’s not in English. It’s in Spanish. I do read and write Spanish. Even taught it but where in my gig did I say I would write technical articles in Spanish? No other info. So I politely wrote to my buyer in Spanish and English asking for more instructions and to send either ready made articles for me to include in the gig or to order a gig from me to research articles. Nothing. Got the exact same replica of the buyer’s first request to write a newsletter using the incomprehensible website. Now a whole day is gone from the gig and I am no wiser. I have to again send a request for more info from the buyer. It’s like an endless loop of reruns of the Lucy and Desi show with Lucy racing around trying to do something that never gets done. :frowning:


#2

hugs Oh, orders like that are enough to drive a person crazy! I usually will wait out the clock for a day or so… then if I still haven’t heard from the client I’ll just send a mutual cancelation. Good luck!


#3

I used to have an article gig that clearly stated 300 to 500 words. Yet, I would get orders stating “minimum 550 words” or “600 words or more please”. For a while I would send a note and offer to comply but tell them it was a one time deal. Unfortunately, give an inch they take a mile.



So I started cancelling the orders (which means I will never likely get past level 2). Funny how offended people get when I explain why gig was cancelled, usually responding with “but you’re such a good writer”. Gee, thanks, but I’d rather not work for free.



While I had several regular clients, it got to the point where it was not worth my time and I was worried I would raise a flag by cancelling too many orders, so I just put the entire gig to rest and moved on to something else. So yes, I know exactly how you feel. No idea how to fix it for you though. Good luck.


#4

@wisewoman99, sorry this has happened to you but unfortunately in business this is not a new thing. Clients do not read. It doesn’t matter how simple you make it for them, they still won’t read. They won’t read emails or contracts or ToS, and when you call them on it they won’t ever have a good excuse for not reading. They also don’t know what they want…well many of them don’t. I’ve learned enough about this outside of Fiverr to tell you it won’t get any better.



I just recently had a client (outside of Fiverr) who asked me to do a landing page for them. They gave me the link to a competitor’s site and said to use that as a template. Keep in mind, they seemed to be asking me to take a full site (several pages & sub-pages) and compact it all into a landing page (a single page). They didn’t give me ANY facts about their company at first other than the name. No founding date, no “about us” blurb, no contact info, nothing about how they were different from or better than the competitor. They didn’t have a logo and didn’t even tell me what pages on the competitor’s site they needed to model after. When I asked for all that info, their response was either “I don’t know,” “I don’t have that,” or “We’re really not all that different from the competitor.” Yet they wanted me to take…something (I can’t really call it “info” as there wasn’t any)…and build an effective landing page. I had to spell out for them the fact that I couldn’t take the competitor’s site and plagiarize, so they’d have to actually do some work and come up with their own facts and services for their company before I could help them. Seems like that should have been common sense from the start. And to be honest, if they hadn’t gotten as far as figuring how their unique selling proposition they probably shouldn’t have been in business in the first place. How anyone thinks they’ll be able to successfully sell a service without clearly defining how they’re different from competitors is beyond me…



I’ve also had clients sign my contract without reading it, then get mad when they get penalized for something (like their website being taken down due to late or no balance payment). The first thing I ask in situations like that is “Did you read your contract fully?” and the answer is almost always no. I can’t and shouldn’t say this for all buyers or clients, but I think that some people just like playing the victim. It gives them a reason to holler and feel important for a little while. I can’t see that not reading benefits them in any other way (unless perhaps it’s a competitor in disguise trying to sabotage your gigs by forcing mutual cancellations). Otherwise, I really just think that buyers and clients expect the world according to how they see it, regardless of the terms or rules that have been set.



I can’t really offer any suggestions for how to avoid it as it WILL continue to happen. However, I WOULD suggest that you clearly define in your gigs the languages that the articles will be delivered in. Don’t assume that people will know this automatically, as Fiverr has buyers from all over the world. So clearly state that all articles will be delivered in English and perhaps create a gig extra out of doing articles in a different language. Then be sure to state that if they want their articles delivered in say, Spanish, that they need to purchase that gig extra in addition to the base gig. Just a though…


#5

I write in capitalized letters as the very first sentence in my desciptions box “CHECK WITH ME FIRST BEFORE YOU BUY THIS GIG” so that it appears that way under the title in the home page. I also write “PLEASE MAKE SURE TO RESPOND TO EACH & EVERY GIG ORDERED OTHERWISE FIVERR WILL NOT PROCESS YOUR ORDER” but that don’t work neither… In fact I am so sick & tired of these lazy types I have refused to do the gigs on account of them not bothering to read my description properly, you know, sent out a mutual cancellation request. They hate that but at least I get the satisfaction of forcing them to read my lengthy reasoning for my strategy.



They then (hopefully) go away having learned how to read something properly for once (albeit begrudgingly) lol


#6

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.


#7

Yeah. I learned to read when I was 3 years old and wanted to know what the duck in the picture book was up to. I found out. Swimming. Well, talking about not reading or not comprehending or whatever the problem with these is people, try teaching their children to speak a foreign language. Their English could qualify as a foreign language in some cases and French and Spanish, well don’t get me started. But the problem with people not reading carefully and thoroughly is such an epidemic that it is endangering the freedom of this country. People vote for candidates without reading at least something of what their candidate believes in. Hey, dude, he’s running on a ticket of wiping out all minorities. Or his idea of a good economy is that he eats out 3 times a week in a really fancy restaurant. Some of our past Presidents were an embarrassment to the country because they couldn’t put three words together without two of them being a grammar error. Or a lie. They even had a term for it, “He misspoke himself.” Sort of like he wet himself and needed a verbal diaper. But such is life. Anyway, the person who tossed a newsletter gig at me with no instructions has just now sent in instructions. Give the person an A+ but give the person a D+ because the instructions were just as mysterious as the non-instructions. Well… OK. Here goes.


#8

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.


#9

hugs Oh, orders like that are enough to drive a person crazy! I usually will wait out the clock for a day or so… then if I still haven’t heard from the client I’ll just send a mutual cancelation. Good luck!


#10

I used to have an article gig that clearly stated 300 to 500 words. Yet, I would get orders stating “minimum 550 words” or “600 words or more please”. For a while I would send a note and offer to comply but tell them it was a one time deal. Unfortunately, give an inch they take a mile.



So I started cancelling the orders (which means I will never likely get past level 2). Funny how offended people get when I explain why gig was cancelled, usually responding with “but you’re such a good writer”. Gee, thanks, but I’d rather not work for free.



While I had several regular clients, it got to the point where it was not worth my time and I was worried I would raise a flag by cancelling too many orders, so I just put the entire gig to rest and moved on to something else. So yes, I know exactly how you feel. No idea how to fix it for you though. Good luck.


#11

@wisewoman99, sorry this has happened to you but unfortunately in business this is not a new thing. Clients do not read. It doesn’t matter how simple you make it for them, they still won’t read. They won’t read emails or contracts or ToS, and when you call them on it they won’t ever have a good excuse for not reading. They also don’t know what they want…well many of them don’t. I’ve learned enough about this outside of Fiverr to tell you it won’t get any better.



I just recently had a client (outside of Fiverr) who asked me to do a landing page for them. They gave me the link to a competitor’s site and said to use that as a template. Keep in mind, they seemed to be asking me to take a full site (several pages & sub-pages) and compact it all into a landing page (a single page). They didn’t give me ANY facts about their company at first other than the name. No founding date, no “about us” blurb, no contact info, nothing about how they were different from or better than the competitor. They didn’t have a logo and didn’t even tell me what pages on the competitor’s site they needed to model after. When I asked for all that info, their response was either “I don’t know,” “I don’t have that,” or “We’re really not all that different from the competitor.” Yet they wanted me to take…something (I can’t really call it “info” as there wasn’t any)…and build an effective landing page. I had to spell out for them the fact that I couldn’t take the competitor’s site and plagiarize, so they’d have to actually do some work and come up with their own facts and services for their company before I could help them. Seems like that should have been common sense from the start. And to be honest, if they hadn’t gotten as far as figuring how their unique selling proposition they probably shouldn’t have been in business in the first place. How anyone thinks they’ll be able to successfully sell a service without clearly defining how they’re different from competitors is beyond me…



I’ve also had clients sign my contract without reading it, then get mad when they get penalized for something (like their website being taken down due to late or no balance payment). The first thing I ask in situations like that is “Did you read your contract fully?” and the answer is almost always no. I can’t and shouldn’t say this for all buyers or clients, but I think that some people just like playing the victim. It gives them a reason to holler and feel important for a little while. I can’t see that not reading benefits them in any other way (unless perhaps it’s a competitor in disguise trying to sabotage your gigs by forcing mutual cancellations). Otherwise, I really just think that buyers and clients expect the world according to how they see it, regardless of the terms or rules that have been set.



I can’t really offer any suggestions for how to avoid it as it WILL continue to happen. However, I WOULD suggest that you clearly define in your gigs the languages that the articles will be delivered in. Don’t assume that people will know this automatically, as Fiverr has buyers from all over the world. So clearly state that all articles will be delivered in English and perhaps create a gig extra out of doing articles in a different language. Then be sure to state that if they want their articles delivered in say, Spanish, that they need to purchase that gig extra in addition to the base gig. Just a though…


#12

I write in capitalized letters as the very first sentence in my desciptions box “CHECK WITH ME FIRST BEFORE YOU BUY THIS GIG” so that it appears that way under the title in the home page. I also write “PLEASE MAKE SURE TO RESPOND TO EACH & EVERY GIG ORDERED OTHERWISE FIVERR WILL NOT PROCESS YOUR ORDER” but that don’t work neither… In fact I am so sick & tired of these lazy types I have refused to do the gigs on account of them not bothering to read my description properly, you know, sent out a mutual cancellation request. They hate that but at least I get the satisfaction of forcing them to read my lengthy reasoning for my strategy.



They then (hopefully) go away having learned how to read something properly for once (albeit begrudgingly) lol


#13

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.


#14

Yeah. I learned to read when I was 3 years old and wanted to know what the duck in the picture book was up to. I found out. Swimming. Well, talking about not reading or not comprehending or whatever the problem with these is people, try teaching their children to speak a foreign language. Their English could qualify as a foreign language in some cases and French and Spanish, well don’t get me started. But the problem with people not reading carefully and thoroughly is such an epidemic that it is endangering the freedom of this country. People vote for candidates without reading at least something of what their candidate believes in. Hey, dude, he’s running on a ticket of wiping out all minorities. Or his idea of a good economy is that he eats out 3 times a week in a really fancy restaurant. Some of our past Presidents were an embarrassment to the country because they couldn’t put three words together without two of them being a grammar error. Or a lie. They even had a term for it, “He misspoke himself.” Sort of like he wet himself and needed a verbal diaper. But such is life. Anyway, the person who tossed a newsletter gig at me with no instructions has just now sent in instructions. Give the person an A+ but give the person a D+ because the instructions were just as mysterious as the non-instructions. Well… OK. Here goes.


#15

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.