Fiverr Community Forum

Forum "cancel culture" advice

Hello everyone,

I have been selling on Fiverr for the last 11 months and during this time gained valuable experience as a Level 2 Seller (future TRS hopeful as well) and Buyer.

Recently I have become active on the forum trying to help out both Buyers and Sellers as much as I can and I am starting to see an alarming trend with advice.

I call this the “cancel culture” many users on the forum reply to simple issues with the immediate response to either cancel the order or contact customers support straightaway. 9/10 these issues could be avoid with simple dialogue between the Buyer & Seller.

I do understand some issues cannot be solved between people and cancelling or involving customer services is required but I would like to start echoing a better initial response to people who are asking advice on the forum.

As a seller it is my job to provide the best service as possible, if a customer has an issue and does not tell me, I cannot react and help solve this. I have seen far too many posts with people saying cancel the order without seeing the full spectrum of information. I believe Fiverr wants both buyer and sellers to work together to find the best solution, not every order is perfect, issues arise from both sides but working together in my experience to a common goal has been the best way of dealing with any issues.

By this way of giving advice we may be able to achieve the following.

  • Reduce customer service response time & back logs

  • Increase Buyer confidence within the platform

  • Improve Buyers initial response to issues

  • Improve Seller’s problem solving & customer support

  • Improve revenue for the platform (each cancelled order has an effect to this eco system we all use)

  • Solve issues between the Buyer and Seller without 3rd party interaction

Just some thoughts and would love to hear everyone’s thoughts.

Thanks,
Andrew

13 Likes

Well said, mate. :raised_hands:

1 Like

Many sellers cancel the order for small issues, which can be solve easily. They do this because they don’t like bad reviews. But they was able to solve it and get a good review. By cancel the order they also effect on the marketplace.

I will try to recommend your post to them

1 Like

My philosophy has always been: “Cancel it if you don’t want to deal with it”. You have no control over the orders you get. Cancellations is the only thing you can somewhat control (and even initiate) while still paying a hefty price for each one of them.

There are orders that are worth fighting for (interesting project, good budget, a buyer who is rude but just a little bit rude so I can pretend that I don’t notice). There are those that are absolutely not. I’ll take a loss of a basic package over a migraine any day. (For reference, I cancel 1-2 orders every 2 months and it’s good that I have a feature that allows me to do that).

If more sellers became less mortified to take a hit instead of dealing with abuse or (let’s be honest) wasting the buyer’s time with their incompetence, I wouldn’t necessarily call it alarming.

UPD: Edited so it doesn’t sound like I’m having cancellation parties in my spare time or something.

7 Likes

I have to respectfully disagree with your philosophy, I do not think it is a good mindset or set of principles (to publicly promote) especially as a Top Rated Seller… to say you love cancelling orders every month because you don’t want to deal with it… its not something I think is positive for our community/platform, which is what my thread is about.

Fiverr as a platform has a order completion Order Completion Rate for a reason, which is bound to each seller level to ensure the completion of jobs and to prevent the platform from descending into a cancel when you feel like it minefield. I totally understand some orders need to be escalated to the customer services or even to be cancelled but my point is based on forum / community advice and how we can strive to offer a better resolution to both buyer & seller.

Thanks,
Andrew

1 Like

I should have said that I loved to have an opportunity to cancel. As opposed to not having an opportunity to cancel and being repeatedly told to “work it out with a buyer” when I’m receiving direct threats in my inbox (true story). All of my cancellations had legitimate reasons behind them and I stand behind each. Not to mention that 1-2 cancellations is less than 0.5% of the orders that I’m getting.

Your respectful disagreement sounds a bit like a tone policing of attitudes I can and cannot have as a TRS. If my tone was too light, well, it’s a forum. I find the tone appropriate for a forum post.

Also, if it’s not clear, yes, cancellations are bad. They are an undesirable outcome. But not an unacceptable one.

3 Likes

My initial post is focused on advice being given to people on the forum to cancel orders as the first action on any issue regardless of the situation or information being presented. My respectfully disagreement is based upon what you wrote in your previous post, as TRS is an elite group of sellers, manually selected for excellence. A huge amount of people look up to those on the forums with this status, my point was not about tone, but the philosophy. :slight_smile:

Well, from my elite pedestal to you: it’s not up to us to decide what any given seller can and can’t deal with. The are language barriers so massive they’re impossible to work around, there are nastier issues mostly women face (that can be considered minor outside looking in), there is again, well, incompetence which can be and should be acknowledged on time, etc. I am, for one, relieved that I see less stories of people getting life sucked out of them for $5 while they are being repeatedly told to “work it out” and (and I quote) “treat every buyer as king”.

As for the broader issue of people giving bad advice on the forum. Yes, true. Most people don’t want an advice, though. They want the issue to go away right this instant and/or to be on the top of the first page in search results. And they’ll let you know that real quick if you attempt to get educational.