How do you market Fiverr gigs?


#1

I’m transitioning into working more from home. I have published one book, write for Hubpages, my blog, and work on Fiverr. I get pretty steady hits on Fiverr most of the time–usually 8-9 gigs at a time. Some of these gigs are $25-$40 but if I’m going to make this work-at-home gig work–I’m going to do double or triple that. I’ve tried putting them on Twitter without much luck. I’m considering putting them on my Facebook author page and my blog (at least the ones relevant to my blog). i have a Google+ account but it rarely gets used. Any other ideas? All my gigs are set to 7 days so most likely–depending on what the person orders–I could get 29 to 30 gigs done a week if I had to–it’s just finding the people. I do have a lot of repeat orders from the same people, which is nice, but I want to make this a profitable business. As an author, I want to stay home and write full-time. Sorry if I am long-winded. :slight_smile:


#2

Reply to @landongrace: Yes, I know. Aside from fiverr, I work as a developer but at same time I am trying to make my brand - Handwritten Solutions and I am completely aware of what it takes to find new customer. Even when you think you have found one, it doesn’t go that smooth.

Some times when you want to present your services, they don’t even want to hear, some times they don’t pay attention.

Other times, despite the great service I offer, although they are amazed and this is what they are looking for, they are just not IT persons and can’t complete their part, so they leave. They are not educated enough in the IT field, and basic IT is what I am talking. I have lost many clients just because this. Those type of clients heart me the most :frowning: They want to collaborate, but they are prevented because it is too complicated for them.



So after a lot of efforts, I am probably going to end up creating some sort of tutorials for some things related with my services to make sure I never lose client for the same reason.



But ok, now at this point I am in a position to put everything I have. To dedicate all my time to make this happen. This is going to change for me in the next 6-7 months due to private life and wife as you said :). But until then I hope to find repetitive buyers that will give me a boost and steady queue.



In any case I am happy and I admire your success. Wish you all the best and hopefully we will share the same badge in a short time :slight_smile:


#3

I would keep all of the different legs of income you currently have. You have great things working.



Shorten your delivery time until you have the amount of orders you want. You may find that 7 days is a long time for many customers. Be aware of time searches. Choosing 4 days instead of 3 days can totally put you out of some searches.



Continue to adjust your offer. I have never stopped refining my offers.



Focus on gigs that inherently have repeat customers. You can really build long term value with repeat customers.



Knowing this is half the battle, I didn’t pursue the following until I believed it was possible. By the way you structure your offer, you can have less than 15% of your order be for $5.00. 70% be for $25-$50.00 and the rest be larger custom orders.



I am able to generate $50-$100 an hour on this platform for 85% of my order. On the small amount of $5.00 orders, I make $10-$20.00 per hour.



You know your gig is on vacation mode right now?


#4

Great tips @landongrace. thanks


#5

People always want to quite their 1 job and replace it with 1 new job (Work from home, freelance). I would recommend never having 1 source of income ever again. If your financial table has more than 3 legs, cutting one leg off your table won’t make your table fall.


#6

I am new and this forum have already answered many of my initial questions. I appreciate those with experience sharing.


#7

Create a website :slight_smile: Always keep adjusting your gigs to make them even better!


#8

Reply to @landongrace: I really like the way you think and the 3 legs table example is awesome, yet completely true.



I am being full time freelancer for more than 3 years now and it really take all you have to give and even more to make it running successfully. It is like running own business and in fact it is.



With regular job you get fixed salary, and work only 8 hours a day. As a freelancer is same as if you are business owner. In order to make it running quite often you will end up working more than 12 hours a day.



Despite that I still wouldn’t change anything and I appreciate being a freelancer. The good things are still more than the bad ones. And the freedom is absolutely No.1



i need to put a lot of lot effort in order to make fiverr to work for me, because I am still new here, but I will try as hard as I can. It looks like great platform and for now I totally like it.


#9

Reply to @handwritten_sol: I spent 12 hours or more per day for about 60 days. I told my wife I was trying something and I would be gone for a while. After you learn to work the deals, you will shorten the time each day. Just know that it can be done and take steps to get there. I don’t know if there is a fast track. It just takes work. Repeat customers were not on my radar at first and I would suggest focusing on that sooner. That really takes the search engine problems away. It is cheaper to keep a client than to get a new one. The repeat custom just needs to need what you offer every week. I have resellers that puts 10 to 20 in my queue at a time.