How do you take a day or weekend off? Share your story


#1

Hello fellow fiverr sellers! I’ve been on fiverr for just over four months and it’s been amazing. WAY more than I ever thought, and it came at a time when I really needed a lucky break. I feel like I’ve found it here. Yay!



But what I’m wondering is how do other fiverr sellers–who are successful and busy with orders here–manage to take a day off? Do you take weekends off regularly? Do you take a regular weekday off?



And when you do take a day off, do you put yourself in vacation mode, or suspend your gigs, or just delay delivery times so you can relax while the orders still pour in?



How do you relax when orders are pouring in? Is it something you just get used to as you’re here longer, and the need to respond immediately becomes less pressing?



I have tried different things to take days off, and am still figuring out the best practices, so I’d love to hear your stories of how you handle this. Thanks!


#2

I don’t take any week end off, because I don’t get enough order. :frowning:


#3

Good question, I was just wondering this earlier today! I’d be interested in seeing how more active sellers cope with orders. I don’t have that many coming in (yet! :D) but I was thinking about using the vacation mode…what happens exactly when we enable it? Are the gigs still visible but people can’t order?


#4

@writerlisaz no such thing as day off for me. Might be different for other sellers with different gigs. A social media manager like myself its tuff to get days off, my work consist to be active on a daily basis. I don’t mind it one bit i love what i do. And if you want to make serious money here or anywhere online you need to hustle it 24/7 all year long.


#5

Reply to @kuntalghosh: Hang in there! Keep trying and hopefully you will…


#6

Reply to @kjblynx: Thanks for that info. I really appreciate knowing how you do/did it. This is a great idea and one I might try!


#7

Reply to @biggz27: I pretty much have been “hustling 24/7,” but I do have a family and my eyes get tired from doing what I do–editing and writing. So I need to learn to take some breaks, which I have been. It helps to get repeat clients who like my work, as I can still make a good income and take some breaks. I hope you’ll give yourself a day of rest soon! Even social media tycoons get a day off once in a while… :slight_smile:


#8

If I need a day off and I don’t want to go onto vacation mode, I’ll usually extend all of my delivery times, like other people have mentioned and drop any buyers a note letting them know that their order will take a bit longer than usual (if they’re a repeat buyer).



You gotta have a day off occasionally to maintain that sanity!


#9

@emasonwrites it can get out of control, i am guessing way more for you since your a Top Rated Seller. better having work than no work


#10

When I started, I had a 1-day turnaround. I read that this attracts customers & I think it did; however, I quickly became overwhelmed and extended my turnaround to 3 days. I can manage orders more easily and not worry if something comes up and I can’t get to an order the same day. You have to create a balance to prevent burnout. I had sellers contact me when I’ve ordered from them that they are running behind & need to go past the deadline. I understand how it is so I don’t get worked up about it but there are other customers that could. You want to produce quality (although quantity can produce more $$ but can leave you at risk in a variety of ways). It also depends on the type of gig you are offering, too. Find out what works for you!


#11

Reply to @fixmyprocess: Thank you! I’ve gone through a similar process–starting with quick turnaround, attracting lots of buyers because of it (and good work), and then having to increase my turnaround time. Most of my buyers that return don’t mind, and I don’t mind if some go to others who can handle the 24 hour turnaround. I just can’t anymore, at least not most days.


#12

Reply to @writerlisaz: I offer same-day with a gig-add on :slight_smile:


#13

All these are good ideas. When you go up in rank, it gives you custom order control which 5 days seems to be the general consensus on how long to put the job out for; since this gives you time to breathe, and it also lets you start gaining the confidence to let jobs get close to the edit. When you first start out, you aim to please for ratings. When you are highly rated, and everyone wants you; you want to really make buyers order the extra fast. Plus, you start raising your prices slowly but surely. It’s the old “supply and demand.” If they want you badly enough, then they are willing to pay, and when they are not willing to pay, you will see your orders slow down; so you adjust your prices accordingly. And no, feeling out of breath, like you are back in an office job, is not unnatural. Keep up the good work!


#14

Reply to @bachas85: Thank you, this is some great advice and ideas. I’ll definitely try out your way of doing things.


#15

Thanks, everyone, for your input and ideas. It’s really nice to know how other sellers do things on fiverr, and I love the community we have here.


#16

Read 4 hour work week :slight_smile:


#17

Reply to @kjblynx: @kjblynx, this is one of the best ideas I’ve heard, and I’m envious that I didn’t think of it first! Much easier than going on vacation or trying to rush through everything during the week and praying that express orders don’t come in on a Saturday afternoon. Thanks for the useful insight!


#18

I don’t. My jobs don’t take much time, so i wouldn’t mind working everyday.


#19

I create extended delivery times ; normally three days more. I also charge a ton for 1 day delivery so that few people grab it. I get maybe 4 to 10 orders a day because I promote off of fiverr so days off are limited. It’s more like easy days vs hard days where I’ll do 10 plus orders in a day or only 3.


#20

Reply to @leecarso: That book is about outsourcing your work to save time. Not cool to even mention it when many of the people here are dedicated to doing the work themselves and not being a middle man.