Fiverr Forum

How to ask a Fiverr Seller for examples of winning or successful work


#1

As a buyer, I want to trust and believe when a seller says they’ve successfully won a crowdsourcing campaign.

But how?

I want to see examples especially when none and I mean absolutely NONE of their references posted have not stated they’ve been successful at raising funding!

I just had one seller beg me to hire her instead of a $5 fiver. She had some poor references. Others have posts that mention the person is a good writer and when they feel comfortable they will post their success. So far NONE have come forward that I read.

So, I’m asking…how am I supposed to know if the seller is a hoax or the real deal if they are unwilling to share links of their successful crowdsourcing campaigns.

If you are thinking I’ll steal info from what they’ve written…get real. I actually need someone to create my specific campaign.

It’s like folks who say they can help you create a winning grant and they have never won a grant.

Any suggestions?

Thank you.


#2

Unfortunately some buyers do try to see examples to steal work so they don’t have to pay (pretty ridicuous as the chances of them getting caught eventually are pretty high), but obviously not all of them do this and it’s very reasonable to want samples to see if you want to buy the service. It’s hard to see who’s genuine and whose not from a seller’s POV as well. Now on the flip side, like you said, it’s hard for buyers to see whose genuine. So if your afraid of being hoaxed, maybe go for a buyer who has built up reviews to back them up. Of course just because someone has no reviews doesn’t mean that they aren’t offering legit services, they just are new to Fiverr. With people with no reviews , I suggest you kindly explain to them your concerns and hope they will send you links/examples. If they refuse, well theres hundreds of other sellers who probably sell the same service! :slight_smile:


#3

When they make an offer just ask them to include some weird word like “chocolate” ( Example: I want someone to be my graphic designer for project x but please include your sales pitch with “chocolate” word). In that sense, you can eliminate those who make automated offers for every buyer out there. And more importantly, you can see how they sell themselves in genuine context.


#4

You could contact me and I could supply you with several links to crowdfunding campaigns I’ve worked on. Sadly they all failed due to being for really terrible ideas.

Would you buy a velcro fridge door locking mechanism which is essentially a completely pointless piece of fuzzy sticky tape? No? - What if was red and could connect to your home wifi?

Regardless of what you are looking to raise funds for, the first thing you should do is hire a pro-social media marketing expert. Specifically, one who will tell you upfront if they would be happy to help market your product and how many marketing impressions they think they might be able to generate for you.

Most Kickstarter projects fail because they are simply awful or someone has slapped on a sales pitch and just sat back and waited for something to happen. It’s social media marketing you need to be focusing on to stand a real fundraising chance. Interviewing $5 writers is essentially just like digging a grave with a teaspoon.


#5

Isnt’t a pro social media expert is the solution for terrible wifi-fridge-velcro ideas? :slight_smile: To sell the unsellable, ice for eskimos?


#6

Your example went over my head. Try another example please.


#7

You’re basically suggesting to select the sellers treating them as stupid.


#8

What @eleazar95 is suggesting is something which is done by buyers in the buyer request section to ensure that sellers who bid on their projects have read and understand what’s being asked for. It’s a good tip as a general rule, but possibly not 100% the thing needed here.

As sellers on Fiverr, we’re bound by confidentiality as much as any other business is. You can read reviews, you can see samples in the portfolio. Asking for anything beyond that is asking for information which sellers shouldn’t be giving to protect their previous buyers’ privacy.


#9

For example, I just had a company on fiverr send me this reason why they cannot provide examples…


Hey there,

I am afraid not, as we are are not at liberty to share any of our clients’ private work without their permission. I would be happy to send you some of our published Amazon product listings though, just so you can get a glimpse of the quality we bring to the table!


Basically, they told me to go kick rocks.

They have lots of great reviews which say, “Great work, I’ll definitely use your services again”.

But that tells me nada.

Was the campaign successful?
Did they post it?

I’m going to use GoFundMe…to raise educational funding. If it works…my friend wants to raise money to go to Mexico to get teeth since she had her rotten teeth ALL removed. Another guy has Polio (which I totally thought had been eradicated…but he’s from Africa) and he needs an updated electric wheelchair.

So, see, there are folks who do need financial assistance and we see folks winning but I’ve been told…it’s difficult to raise funds on crowdsourcing platforms. Yet, it can be done with an excellent story, video/pictures…

And as @cyaxrex responded…marketing it correctly!


#10

Where are samples listed on the website?
I’m understanding you are saying some sellers may have samples but I’ve not seen anything like that. And if they have them…where can I find them on the profile? (Is it a link?..an icon?)

Wouldn’t it be so easy to have a couple happy clients say Yes, I’ll gladly be your example and share my winning campaign (and they block out words so, all we see on the campaign is that they won, the picture they used, a partial title or something?)…I’m just throwing that out there.

It’s like a baker who says…I bake cakes and can bake a 3-tiered cake but will not allow you to see a picture of their work or let a bride do a taste testing, etc.


#11

Let me rephrase…

I understand saying the word chocolate.

The “example” given did not make sense to me.


#12

Yes - sellers may have examples of graphics or video work they’ve done in their portfolio.

That’s what a portfolio does, but not every business is willing to give up their anonymity to support a seller - it would be their work with nothing redacted.

It may be what you’re looking for in terms of example work isn’t available on Fiverr as a platform.


#13

I agree that this might be the kind of thing where people want to remain private, and not announce that here is Mrs. Smith for example who was a successful client of mine.

However there should be at least one that they can give as a reference I would think.


#14

Campaigns take time. Sellers can write for the campaign and deliver their writing, but unless the buyer comes back after, say, 3 months, and tells them that it was successful, they have no way of knowing whether the buyer got the funds they needed or not. And buyers are in no way obliged to return and tell their sellers the results of the campaign.


#15

Some sellers have portfolios outside of Fiverr, that might display the information you need.

I don’t have that because it would compromise my privacy.


#16

No they did not.

Believe it or not, preserving a former client’s confidentiality in relation to the work the Seller completed for her/him is a perfectly reasonable and rational reason for deciding to share said work. How would you feel if your own work was shared without your consent?


#17

Of course, it didn’t make sense. If it makes sense then everyone can do it. This is another way to test their creativity.


#18

This is one of the examples that can be used by the buyers. I’m not suggesting them to use it in every category like data entry which required more organization than creativity. Besides, being freelancer requires a tough personality. It’s another mind game to weed out those who can’t follow instructions due to pride issue. Remember, no matter how good we are we should always do what best for the customer because at the end of the day they pay us to solve their problem not adding another one. You may suggest them what to do since you’re expert but ultimately it still has to tailor their preference compared to your own experience.


#19

I can do my best for my customers answering genuinely to genuine questions.
I’m not available to play games. I assume I’m dealing with adults.

Analogies are risky; they usually fuel flames. But to give you an idea:

– Buyer: I would like a cotton shirt, slim-fit, not too expensive, Copacabana. What do you recommend?
And please, start answering saying the name of the place that I’ve just mentioned. I need it to understand if you are paying attention
.

– Me: please leave.


Do people actually work for such low prices?
#20

Glad to hear we’re on the same page then! But you cannot assume every customer is the same. They will be always a factor at play which is outside of your comfort zone and considering Fiverr is full of scammers these days, you need to show that you’re different and open-minded to a new idea. That’s how you build credibility. You might be the best at what you do but dealing kindly with all buyers and creating a reputation, needs patience and I would say it is an art itself. But I got what you mean. It just wasn’t the best idea in the grand scheme of things. What I will suggest is send a custom offer to them that tick all their checklist. Then they will see even though you didn’t mention the word Copacabana you still understand what they want. Customers are willing to pay more if you’re sensitive to their needs.