Immoral Marketplace


#1

I am curious to know what others feel about those who post gigs for like reading out testimonials. Essentially, making fake testimonials in exchange for money. In my view, these damage society by institutionalizing dishonesty and misleading potential customers. They give advantage to those who are dishonest. What do you think?


#2

Honestly, all, and i mean ALL big companies hire actors for their comercials and infomercials. Anyone that has ever worked in corporate marketing will tell you this. From weight loss products to junk food, they all hire people for testimonials and for image.


#3

I’ve had buyers ask me to write fake testimonials for their company. Personally, I refuse to do this. Others may be happy to do it and that’s fine but I don’t want it on my conscious if someone has bought something and been ill/suffered health or other problems from it.


#4

Legitimate form of advertising / customer feedback:



So I have customers who love what we do and send us exceptional feedback. My customers have customers who do the same. When I ask them if they will allow us to make a video, often they are “camera shy” and do NOT want to be in a video. Now video is one of the biggest ranking methods I use by far these days for my business and my SEO customers.



So, I take THEIR feedback, create a script and GET THEIR PERMISSION to create a video using an “actor” which I then use as testimonial. This is standard practice and like startselect mentions, has been in advertising for years. It is fair and legal (truth in advertising laws).



Do you think all those people on TV that say “I love this product” are actually customers?


#5

Reply to @startselect: I agree that a large proportion of all advertising is dishonest, but that doesn’t make it OK. However, the big difference here, is that in commercials, it is clear that they are made with actors reading scripts. But on Fiverr, people are clearly offering themselves to represent un-invested members of the public. IN my view, it’s entirely different.


#6

Reply to @aingham69: Congratulations on your personal moral stand. But why is it fine if others choose to do lie for money?


#7

Reply to @lparziale: I have 318 written testimonials on my website. Every one 100% genuine. I think your stance is OK, as long as you say the words are read by actors.



No - I don’t think it’s OK for commercials to lie, and yes, I do think they do. In fact I’ve been very active (though totally ineffective) in getting UK advertising “fixed”. In the UK the industry is self-policing and the Watchdog has a vested interest, and no teeth.



Bottom line (generally - not specuifically for Iparziale): Do you like the world we live in - or is it full of fragglesrock who are out to shaft you for your money, and who really don’t care for decency?



If you want a better world, start at home.


#8

Reply to @chrisxenon: Sorry, I meant that it’s fine by me if a buyer wants to take their money elsewhere, not that its find for others to lie for money. I rarely trust written reviews on websites anymore (including Amazon) because of the amount of times I’ve been asked to write them without even using the product/service - and been told that I can’t say anything negative. I’ve once been asked to review a medical product and, even though it hadn’t been approved by the FDA, hadn’t been proven through clinical trials and the side effects were unknown, was told that it had to be completely positive and share the benefits…needless to say, that order was cancelled!



I think I misread the first part though about reading out testimonials. If I offered a gig of reading out a script then I’d probably do it as the testimonials may be genuine. I don’t, mine are writing and transcribing gigs, and I won’t write a fake testimonial.


#9

The do it for money. That’s their job. They are not responsible for the product that a seller is offering.


#10

As far back as time goes humans have always tried to find an angle to get something done. I have a huge problem with fake reviews and testimonials but in today’s world that is how thing rolls. The key is to learn how to decipher legitimate from fake reviews. It can be done you just have to open your eyes


#11

Reply to @chrisxenon: I understand and agree, full disclosure and honesty is the best policy. I was just trying to give a legitimate reason someone may order a testimonial video.


#12

Reply to @startselect: I agree that a large proportion of all advertising is dishonest, but that doesn’t make it OK. However, the big difference here, is that in commercials, it is clear that they are made with actors reading scripts. But on Fiverr, people are clearly offering themselves to represent un-invested members of the public. IN my view, it’s entirely different.


#13

Reply to @aingham69: Congratulations on your personal moral stand. But why is it fine if others choose to do lie for money?


#14

Reply to @lparziale: I have 318 written testimonials on my website. Every one 100% genuine. I think your stance is OK, as long as you say the words are read by actors.



No - I don’t think it’s OK for commercials to lie, and yes, I do think they do. In fact I’ve been very active (though totally ineffective) in getting UK advertising “fixed”. In the UK the industry is self-policing and the Watchdog has a vested interest, and no teeth.



Bottom line (generally - not specuifically for Iparziale): Do you like the world we live in - or is it full of fragglesrock who are out to shaft you for your money, and who really don’t care for decency?



If you want a better world, start at home.


#15

Reply to @chrisxenon: Sorry, I meant that it’s fine by me if a buyer wants to take their money elsewhere, not that its find for others to lie for money. I rarely trust written reviews on websites anymore (including Amazon) because of the amount of times I’ve been asked to write them without even using the product/service - and been told that I can’t say anything negative. I’ve once been asked to review a medical product and, even though it hadn’t been approved by the FDA, hadn’t been proven through clinical trials and the side effects were unknown, was told that it had to be completely positive and share the benefits…needless to say, that order was cancelled!



I think I misread the first part though about reading out testimonials. If I offered a gig of reading out a script then I’d probably do it as the testimonials may be genuine. I don’t, mine are writing and transcribing gigs, and I won’t write a fake testimonial.


#16

The do it for money. That’s their job. They are not responsible for the product that a seller is offering.


#17

As far back as time goes humans have always tried to find an angle to get something done. I have a huge problem with fake reviews and testimonials but in today’s world that is how thing rolls. The key is to learn how to decipher legitimate from fake reviews. It can be done you just have to open your eyes


#18

Reply to @chrisxenon: I understand and agree, full disclosure and honesty is the best policy. I was just trying to give a legitimate reason someone may order a testimonial video.


#19

Reply to @startselect: I agree that a large proportion of all advertising is dishonest, but that doesn’t make it OK. However, the big difference here, is that in commercials, it is clear that they are made with actors reading scripts. But on Fiverr, people are clearly offering themselves to represent un-invested members of the public. IN my view, it’s entirely different.


#20

Reply to @aingham69: Congratulations on your personal moral stand. But why is it fine if others choose to do lie for money?