Is the new License gig extra deterring sales?


#1

The new gig extra that Fiverr added for voiceover related gigs is starting to be a concern. Has anyone seen a drop in sales or any backlash from it? Especially from repeat buyers.


#2

I’ve left it on. I haven’t really seen a hit to sales, But, it’s too new to tell.

However, I did have one buyer message me post-sale to ask if they should purchase the commercial license after-the-sale to stay in the clear.



I’m glad it’s there. If your studio turns out quality work, then you should be compensated for it. Most of my clients on Fiverr tend to be professional production companies and radio/tv stations anyway. If they’re legit, they won’t even blink at $20 for a commercial license. Outside Fiverr, they’re getting charged $1 per word, or $100 per session, minimum, plus scope of distribution charges, and sometimes residuals.



So, it serves to help me to work with serious clients that understand the value of what they are getting. However, if Joe Q Public, wants me to recite a poem for his daughter’s birthday, I’m still within reach.



It also filters out the the people that I don’t want to work with. You know, the folks who think you should read an audio book for $5, and even that’s too expensive for them… If those people see my rates and crap their pants, then GOOD. I don’t want to work with those people. These are the people that will try and get you to lower your rates. “The Bottom Feeders” I bet these people try and buy a Ferrari and tell the salesman: “you know, that dealer across the street has a Ford Focus for only $24k. Would you sell me this Ferrari for that price?” No.



Now, not everyone can do this. If you’re new to voiceover, like the majority of the gigs I see on here, then you’re not offering the same level of service as a full production studio. There is a market for your services, but unfortunately it’s working for the bottom feeders, and they will never pay for a commercial license.



So, is it a good option to have? Absolutely! Is it well suited to everyone, definitely not.



#3

Absolutely, and it might be violating Fiverr’s rules. Fiverr clearly stipulates that when you deliver work to a buyer, the work now belongs to a buyer. It’s no longer yours. So this commercial license use seems very sneaky.



It’s also too much money for too little work.


#4

Fees, license, what’s next – charge to use CS. :slight_smile:


#5

Reply to @liquidlettuce: Completely agree, a business will not stop ordering for $20 extra, they will know they have had it good anyway. It will be good for all of us, we make more money and so does Fiverr.


#6

I’m in two minds about this.

Can see both sides of the argument.

A decent client shouldn’t blink at $20 but a lot of my clients come here to get a cheap voice over.



And I believe it is implied in the Fiverr TOS that all completed work belongs to the client and so they should be free to use it how they see fit.



Having said that, I have very irregular orders so I have no way of really measuring the success of using this feature against not using it.


#7

Fiverr has a ton of great features. You don’t have to use all of them. I choose not to use the extra fee for licensing. My gig structure is working well.


#8
liquidlettuce said: I bet these people try and buy a Ferrari and tell the salesman: "you know, that dealer across the street has a Ford Focus for only $24k. Would you sell me this Ferrari for that price?" No.


LOVE this comparison. I might have to use it the next time a buyer presents me with a 500 word script asking if I can do it for $5 ;)