Fiverr Community Forum

Is there a different way to become a PRO seller

Hi, I hope you are doing well. Fiverr PRO is indeed a great opportunity for writers to showcase their talent and skills. While carefully analyzing the requirements for “PRO,” I came to know that a seller applying for “Fiverr PRO” must have a strong online presence on various professional platforms such as LinkedIn, Dribble, etc. What if the seller does not have a robust affiliation with people on these sites?

Also, “Fiverr PRO,” says “Don’t tell us, Show us?” I assume this means that a writer applying to PRO must show them their work is published online, how many companies he or she has worked with. Coming to the point, I have worked for two years with a writing company as a Research Analyst, Article Writer, and Quality Assurance Executive. I have written thousands of articles, blog posts, white papers, product descriptions, business articles etc but I don’t know where are they published. Moreover, since I worked for the company, I don’t own the work I did because it is all the property of the respective owners (company’s clients).

I can provide my educational documents, job experience letter, certificates, rewards and recognition I received during the two years, and other significant information to Fiverr. Fiverr can verify the documents. Is this acceptable? Will they promote me as a PRO-Seller? Please guide me.

2 Likes

Hi, I am a Fiverr Pro seller, and I would say not to view these guidelines as “set in stone.”

Both myself (writer) and my wife (editor) applied for and were accepted for Fiverr Pro, so I think I have enough insight to respond to each of your points.

Neither of us use any of these sites extensively. I occasionally log into LinkedIn, but that’s about it. I have my own portfolio website (just a SquareSpace site, which you can easily find to see what I offered as a portfolio.) I do not have a presenece on any of the other sites mentioned there. I never post to Twitter, and my Facebook is purely for friends and family, not business contacts.

This is correct, and this is what I offered as “social proof” - a good quality of work, collaborating with known businesses, and demonstrating a professional approach to business relationships. I think this is one of the most important areas if you do not have the network effect proof that I talked about above.

Most of the work I submitted was ghostwritten, so it did not need to have a byline from me.

I don’t recall having to submit formal documents, especially as I didn’t really have anything like that (although my wife did) - I am sure this will all help your application.

I wrote a lot more about getting accepted as a Pro seller on the Fiverr blog, which you may find very useful. You can find that info here:

https://blog.fiverr.com/a-best-practice-guide-to-becoming-an-fiverr-pro-seller/

Hope this helps, and good luck!

2 Likes

Thank you very much @paulmaplesden. I really appreciate it. I will go through the blog post. Stay blessed !

1 Like

Sir, one more question. I have never worked directly with clients but via a company where I worked for two years. I have the project files in my laptop but I believe they are all property of their respective owners and publishing them online on my website will by violating the privacy or copyright law. This means I don’t have any proof making me a ghost writer. I was awarded writer of the month certificate thrice by the company. The bottom line is that I find myself ineligible. This does not mean that I am not a good writer. Will the customer support or team Fiverr understand the situation? Please guide me.