Live Backgrounds or even green screen editing in


#1

I would be interested in learning how it is done and what is needed to make it happen…anyone care to share?


#2

oldbittygrandma is correct! But you only actually need 1 light, or even natural sunlight. So long as the light is diffused it produces very little shadow. It’s easier to do a single light setup than a multiple light setup for someone new to doing it. Multiple lights create multiple angles for shadows, thus more setup. That’s also where the distance comes in, the furthur away you are the less shadows are created. A soft box would make any light usable, and they’re easy to make. Basically, just something in front of a light to make it softer. Very cheap and it would eliminate a need for multiple lights. The other reason a lot of people use a 3 light setup is to have light on the persons shoulders. This helps ‘Pop them out’ of the backround. But, using soft light nulls that almost. Most sit-coms are made using soft light, it’s only when you get into better cameras/lenses that you require more pop due to the depth of field of the higher quality camera. Experiment, have fun with it.



In reality, it’s all up to the person doing it. I’ve worked on numerous large scale productions that do everything by the book and get great results. Obviously. But I’[ve worked on numerous small, no budget productions that get close to the same effect. Now that you got the basics, it’s all about experimenting! :wink:


#3

Hi there.

I’m not 100% sure what it is you’re asking, but I think I do.



Green screening, is done like this. (Quick version).



Set up a green backround for yourself. Green sheets, even green construction paper if you have it. (You’ll have to tape together a lot of it though). Myself? I went to the fabric store and purchased a bunch of it. The greener the better. Make sure you it is big enough to allow you to stand far enough away from it when filming so you don’t leave a shadow.



Next, light up the room. For new greenscreeners, try to make the light as diffused as possible, this is to remove shadows. Again. You want as little shadows as possible. More light, and stand as far away as you can so you don’t create them.



Next, after filming you color key. I use After Effects, but there’s a lot of free stuff out there that have it as a feature.



Basically, it takes the green color and makes it transparent, showing anything you put behind it. That’s why you don’t want shadows, because the shadows will make the ‘Green’ darker which will make it harder to “Key out” the green wall you made. That’s one of the reasons you pick the ugliest green color you can find. It makes it easier to Key.



After that, slap whatever you want in the backround, a picture, or something you filmed earlier and there you go. You’re in front of it.



That’s the basics. Before you go hunting for green fabric or paper you should track down a “Color Keying” program.



Oh, and you can use Blue as well. You choose Green or blue depending on what kind of cloths you will be wearing. When using green you don’t want to wear any green cloths because they will become invisible… Or maybe you do? Same goes for blue.


#4

@bigbadbilly thanks so much!! @oldbittygrandma thank you as well!


#5

I’ve played around with natural light, single lights and multiple lights for a green screen and after all three I still feel that the multiple is best as it will remove that shadow if you angle it right in any direction but you have to make sure the lights are all one color and bright enough. I went to school for video production and had to do a giant presentation which placed one of my friends on what seemed like a live TV show so I guess I can say I am half a professional on it but I never had the money of space for my own personal green screen room like we had in our school.


#6

Wow thank you all for the input. Now let me ask this. Is it possible when not using a blue or green screen to remove a background?


#7

I know it will look way better to use them but I’d figure I ask since I not actually sure about it.


#8

I guess it all depends on what you’re going for. Single lights are used on larger setups. Again, because you are not expected to be anywhere near the screen itself… So you don’t cast shadows on it. One of the main reasons single light ‘Can’ be better is because it’s the same all around. (Like @dracosama said, beats the need to get the exact same 3 lights with the same temperature.).



@oldbittygandma - Ha ha ha. The strands of hair really do suck. I don’t know what level you’re at (But since you purchased a version of Vegas I’m sure you’re pretty pro since people generally don’t put money into a program unless they are good at using it!), or about Chromakeyer, (Never used it) but to help with hair strands you can apply another matte layer and apply it in the middle of your footage and key. Soften the edges and It really helps.



As for altering the backround and not keying… it can be done but you’re talking a lot of money to do it… a lot of effort and a production house. Your asking about removing backround on a video. I’ve seen a project that required moving a truck out of frame because of a logo. The scene lasted 7-8 seconds and cost in the area of 30 grand. All because the director didn’t pay attention to his rented back round. Not a good option. Could have been done cheaper I’m sure, but this was an insured production.



@dracosama - Awesome! Good to see fellow film tinkerers here!



BTW. I’ve been in the film industry about 6 years now. (More if you count the tinkering before entering). That’s how I make my living outside Fiverr. 90% of the time behind the camera since I’m kind of… well… ugly LOL. I mainly edit and do light effects. But I’ve directed 1 feature, a few shorts and 2 shows. Editing… the number is much… much greater. :slight_smile:



PS: I’m not amazing in the industry or anything like that, I just make a living mainly editing. I’d post a link but it would get ‘Fraggled’ out. Ha ha.


#9

Wow thanks for this topic. I never knew how greenscreen worked… and was always curious!


#10

Wow, thanks great video and amazing LUV from @OldBittyGrandma


#11

Reply to @oldbittygrandma: I’ve done it for a while… that doesn’t mean I’m good at it. LOL. But i’ve been there with people who are. The thing is about keying is that there’s not 1 wrong thing posted here. Everything from everyone is right. It’s all comes down to the situation or practicality. I’d love to hear from someone that has set up a permanent green screen, made a room or something. That person would probably have some amazing tips.



— Ahhh yes. The quest to better a computer based on video. It is indeed never ending.


#12

Reply to @bigbadbilly: So you are in film, niceee! Thanks so much for sharing your wealth of knowledge with all of us!


#13

Reply to @ceceliavo: A little. LOL. But that’s another life outside Fiverr. :slight_smile:


#14

Reply to @bigbadbilly: I hear you! I’m an aspiring actress sort of haha always nice to meet people with the same interests.


#15

Here is another question. How would you put your recorded video onto an image…?


#16

Reply to @ceceliavo: That’s cool. Don’t give up! There will always be a market for actresses, you just have to slowly build your contacts. I’m not Hollywood or anything, Nothing so glamorous. Independent is my domain. And my own stuff to date has been borderline flopish. I say borderline because I have earned some cult viewers and made a lot of friends/contacts. I have worked on large scale stuff, still independent of course, but that’s not my stuff. I was just employed. LOL - Working on a make or break project now. A little luck would be great. :slight_smile:


#17

Reply to @bigbadbilly: Niceee yeah I’m starting small. The biggest thing I’ve done was an extra for the movie 21 a few years back. I’m trying to get into indie stuff for now.


#18

oldbittygrandma is correct! But you only actually need 1 light, or even natural sunlight. So long as the light is diffused it produces very little shadow. It’s easier to do a single light setup than a multiple light setup for someone new to doing it. Multiple lights create multiple angles for shadows, thus more setup. That’s also where the distance comes in, the furthur away you are the less shadows are created. A soft box would make any light usable, and they’re easy to make. Basically, just something in front of a light to make it softer. Very cheap and it would eliminate a need for multiple lights. The other reason a lot of people use a 3 light setup is to have light on the persons shoulders. This helps ‘Pop them out’ of the backround. But, using soft light nulls that almost. Most sit-coms are made using soft light, it’s only when you get into better cameras/lenses that you require more pop due to the depth of field of the higher quality camera. Experiment, have fun with it.



In reality, it’s all up to the person doing it. I’ve worked on numerous large scale productions that do everything by the book and get great results. Obviously. But I’[ve worked on numerous small, no budget productions that get close to the same effect. Now that you got the basics, it’s all about experimenting! :wink:


#19

Hi there.

I’m not 100% sure what it is you’re asking, but I think I do.



Green screening, is done like this. (Quick version).



Set up a green backround for yourself. Green sheets, even green construction paper if you have it. (You’ll have to tape together a lot of it though). Myself? I went to the fabric store and purchased a bunch of it. The greener the better. Make sure you it is big enough to allow you to stand far enough away from it when filming so you don’t leave a shadow.



Next, light up the room. For new greenscreeners, try to make the light as diffused as possible, this is to remove shadows. Again. You want as little shadows as possible. More light, and stand as far away as you can so you don’t create them.



Next, after filming you color key. I use After Effects, but there’s a lot of free stuff out there that have it as a feature.



Basically, it takes the green color and makes it transparent, showing anything you put behind it. That’s why you don’t want shadows, because the shadows will make the ‘Green’ darker which will make it harder to “Key out” the green wall you made. That’s one of the reasons you pick the ugliest green color you can find. It makes it easier to Key.



After that, slap whatever you want in the backround, a picture, or something you filmed earlier and there you go. You’re in front of it.



That’s the basics. Before you go hunting for green fabric or paper you should track down a “Color Keying” program.



Oh, and you can use Blue as well. You choose Green or blue depending on what kind of cloths you will be wearing. When using green you don’t want to wear any green cloths because they will become invisible… Or maybe you do? Same goes for blue.


#20

@bigbadbilly thanks so much!! @oldbittygrandma thank you as well!