Low ratings


#1

It’s so frustrating to get low ratings on orders from people who aren’t reading. I feel like I go above and beyond at the 5.00 price point and it makes me crazy that I get REALLY low ratings when my description clearly states that most of the portfolio is upgraded. Do you nudge buyers by suggesting an upgrade? And when they refuse and give low feedback because they don’t get what they want, what do you do?


#2

If a buyer orders something and what they’ve requested requires an extra/more money in order to be worth both of our time, I always give them the choice of adding the required funds or canceling the order–as soon after they’ve placed the order as possible. I know it’s not always possible to get a sense of whether or not a buyer is expecting something beyond what they’ve paid for, but the second you get the impression that they might be, it’s always best to ask them to clarify their expectations and then to state their options.



Specifically, asking them to reference which pictures in your profile they thought their logo would look like is a good way to be able to say, “Ah, well, if that’s the look/level of finishing you’re looking for, the price will be $x.” Obviously, those are suggestion for future. I think you’re fairly clear about what costs more than $5 in your gig description. Maybe being very clear about what $5 gets a buyer would help; i.e. something like "$5 will get you a simple, hand-drawn logo. All animals, people, and other additional/more complex figures will be an additional cost. Please contact me to discuss the price of your project before buying!"



I think your response to his feedback was very appropriate. That’s really all you can do, once the feedback has been left. CS is pretty stingy about what feedback they will or will not remove, but I suppose it never hurts to ask, especially if you felt that he was trying to pressure you into doing more work than he’d paid for.


#3

That’s certainly frustrating.



The logo designs in your live portfolio live up to your descriptions, and that bad review will get buried pretty quickly, I think.



As for your question about the nudge, there’s no reason to be ashamed of your pricing schedule. State your fee – politely, of course – and be clear about what needs an “upgrade” in case your buyer doesn’t read very well.



Not knowing exactly what that buyer wanted, I can only guess which upgrades were needed, but let’s pretend that the request included a picture of a wombat. You indicate that pictures of animals and people are extra. In this case, the ‘nudge’ could be something like, “It sounds like a lovely project. Once you’ve added the extra ($X) for inclusion of an animal picture, I’ll add it to my design calendar.” Or, “Great! Thanks for your order. Once you’ve added the extra ($X) for including an animal picture in the design, I’ll get started.” Adjust the phrasing according to how many orders you have in the queue, of course.



In several other threads, other sellers on this forum have mentioned that buyers often do not read all the way through the descriptions. Maybe it would help if you put an indication that pictures of people and animals are extra right after the line that reads, “Type and very simple icon, digitally drawn.” Perhaps add, “Pictures of animals and people are extra” right there, before you continue to the comment about most of the samples being upgrades?



Cheers.


#4

Thank you for the input… all great advice and appreciated.