Question - how can I get my business involved (selling) on Fiverr?


#1

I know Fiverr is very against listing your website or company when selling. My small company provides educational tutoring; could one of my instructors, while in a live video gig, mention our company? Could they say “hey, I hope you enjoyed your tutoring session, here’s our website–if you’d like more lessons, get in touch!.” In the gig could we say "John is a professional instructor with NAME OF MY COMPANY."



Honestly I think it’s a very bad move o Fiverr’s part not to allow even the discussion of anything outside of Fiverr…look at fragglesrock.com and the success that they’ve had vs. competitors who decided to be stingy. I would guess that if Fiverr doesn’t change their policy in the long run, a competitor that is more business friendly will swoop in pretty hard. What companies with this business model don’t seem to understand is that consumers will still purchase through their platform, and the sellers WANT them to do so–by purchasing through fiverr, the consumer gets peace of mind that their transaction is secure (not to mention it’s very quick and easy to make the transaction), and the seller gets more feedback and higher ratings, which in turn helps them find more consumers…through the fiverr platform.


#2

Almost forgot - THANK you for the insights!


#3

I think the TOS wouldn’t allow users to refer to external websites - you said it yourself consumers want to have a secure platform when purchasing from sellers, and the TOS was created with this in mind.


#4

Let’s be clear. The bigger question is, what does your company provide that you cannot provide here (as you level up and get bigger gig extras) I mean as a TRS, you can sell a single order for $505 (provided you also pimp out the “Super Fast Delivery” extra at $100 as well).



So, I’d change the question.



How can I use Fiverr as a “satellite” and “alternative” ecommerce platform.



Sellers, ones who have both more and less to lose than I do, are OFTEN being invited to do business outside Fiverr. However, when you get a good thing going here, you won’t want to mess that up. Not just as a TOS thing… but also, the “supporting Fiverr” …it’s like paying an affiliate.



Finally, I disagree about the someone else will come in a swoop…



The fact of the matter is there are a goodly number of “more liberal” …largely… copycat /clone marketplaces. And they don’t have anywhere near the traffic.



Additionally, fiverr has enjoyed $5-Million in first round venture capital. Followed by $15-Million in a second round. Now if you know a little about venture capital, first…you don’t get a second round …well, a) because you don’t need it AND b) because the proof of concept is clearly being shown – even if the burn rate is still high.



SO why do I mention burn rate, well simply… Late adapters are going to find it very hard to access the capital and even if they got first round funding, if I had any influence on Fiverr Strategy, I would go into pure SIEGE warfare and up their burn big time–and if it gets even a little close to “shining” buy it out.


#5

anarch, we simply could not support a high volume of repeat business through fiverr We offer language instruction, private one-on-one lessons, and have an integrated purchasing/scheduling system via our website. There’s zero possibility that we could handle more than 20 or 30 lessons/week being scheduled through fiverr, which would mean 10 - 15 customers (average is about 2 hours of studying/week/customer) simply due to scheduling. Customers have to use our online scheduling system to book lessons, otherwise it would be pure chaos of back and forth emails, phone calls, etc. with customers trying to schedule. Simply not possible.



I won’t argue with you on the competition question, and yes I do know a tiny bit about venture capital :wink: Look at the history of the service provider outlet space (fragglesrock), among many others, and you might change your mind as to whether new competition can come in with large amounts of capital and a better business model (allowing businesses as well as individual service providers), and be competitive.



The question always comes down to: how can I provide the best possible product for my customers? By more or less not allowing real businesses to provide services on Fiverr, Fiverr is putting misguided profit motivation ahead of providing the best possible product for their customers. Imagine if there were real businesses offering gigs on Fiverr…high quality product pretty much guaranteed for the customer, 20% commission for Fiverr, and good marketing for the business providing the gig. All-around a win-win. As a business owner I would use Fiverr, have all first-time customers pay through the Fiverr portal, and then ask that the customer start going directly through us. I would even pay a pretty good extra commission for this. We do this exact thing with fragglesrock right now, and it works very well.



Fiverr of course thinks they’ll lose money when the customer starts doing business directly with us rather than through Fiverr. That’s such a short-sided view, which has been proven false so many times with this business model that it pains me to have to repeat it :slight_smile:


#6

HA! I just noticed the website I listed in my initial post was changed to some weird fragglesrock website. There’s a perfect example–Fiverr is so scared of people using outside resources, even in their discussion forums you can’t list an external website. It’s like sitting down to have a drink at a bar, and if you mention a restaurant on the other side of town the bartender hits you upside the head with a baseball bat because he’s terrified you’ll get up and drive across town to have dinner instead of have a drink at his bar. Crazy, if you ask me.


#7

Right, because I’m assuming you aren’t running a small business? If you were, you wouldn’t be able to use Fiverr! Or would you? That’s my question…


#8

Reply to @jraitchi:



If you click on OldBittyGrandma’s name you’ll discover she has quite an impressive small business. She runs it on Fiverr.


#9

Depends on what you’re doing… some businesses will work… Others wont :slight_smile:


#10

Almost forgot - THANK you for the insights!


#11

I think the TOS wouldn’t allow users to refer to external websites - you said it yourself consumers want to have a secure platform when purchasing from sellers, and the TOS was created with this in mind.


#12

Let’s be clear. The bigger question is, what does your company provide that you cannot provide here (as you level up and get bigger gig extras) I mean as a TRS, you can sell a single order for $505 (provided you also pimp out the “Super Fast Delivery” extra at $100 as well).



So, I’d change the question.



How can I use Fiverr as a “satellite” and “alternative” ecommerce platform.



Sellers, ones who have both more and less to lose than I do, are OFTEN being invited to do business outside Fiverr. However, when you get a good thing going here, you won’t want to mess that up. Not just as a TOS thing… but also, the “supporting Fiverr” …it’s like paying an affiliate.



Finally, I disagree about the someone else will come in a swoop…



The fact of the matter is there are a goodly number of “more liberal” …largely… copycat /clone marketplaces. And they don’t have anywhere near the traffic.



Additionally, fiverr has enjoyed $5-Million in first round venture capital. Followed by $15-Million in a second round. Now if you know a little about venture capital, first…you don’t get a second round …well, a) because you don’t need it AND b) because the proof of concept is clearly being shown – even if the burn rate is still high.



SO why do I mention burn rate, well simply… Late adapters are going to find it very hard to access the capital and even if they got first round funding, if I had any influence on Fiverr Strategy, I would go into pure SIEGE warfare and up their burn big time–and if it gets even a little close to “shining” buy it out.


#13

anarch, we simply could not support a high volume of repeat business through fiverr We offer language instruction, private one-on-one lessons, and have an integrated purchasing/scheduling system via our website. There’s zero possibility that we could handle more than 20 or 30 lessons/week being scheduled through fiverr, which would mean 10 - 15 customers (average is about 2 hours of studying/week/customer) simply due to scheduling. Customers have to use our online scheduling system to book lessons, otherwise it would be pure chaos of back and forth emails, phone calls, etc. with customers trying to schedule. Simply not possible.



I won’t argue with you on the competition question, and yes I do know a tiny bit about venture capital :wink: Look at the history of the service provider outlet space (fragglesrock), among many others, and you might change your mind as to whether new competition can come in with large amounts of capital and a better business model (allowing businesses as well as individual service providers), and be competitive.



The question always comes down to: how can I provide the best possible product for my customers? By more or less not allowing real businesses to provide services on Fiverr, Fiverr is putting misguided profit motivation ahead of providing the best possible product for their customers. Imagine if there were real businesses offering gigs on Fiverr…high quality product pretty much guaranteed for the customer, 20% commission for Fiverr, and good marketing for the business providing the gig. All-around a win-win. As a business owner I would use Fiverr, have all first-time customers pay through the Fiverr portal, and then ask that the customer start going directly through us. I would even pay a pretty good extra commission for this. We do this exact thing with fragglesrock right now, and it works very well.



Fiverr of course thinks they’ll lose money when the customer starts doing business directly with us rather than through Fiverr. That’s such a short-sided view, which has been proven false so many times with this business model that it pains me to have to repeat it :slight_smile:


#14

HA! I just noticed the website I listed in my initial post was changed to some weird fragglesrock website. There’s a perfect example–Fiverr is so scared of people using outside resources, even in their discussion forums you can’t list an external website. It’s like sitting down to have a drink at a bar, and if you mention a restaurant on the other side of town the bartender hits you upside the head with a baseball bat because he’s terrified you’ll get up and drive across town to have dinner instead of have a drink at his bar. Crazy, if you ask me.


#15

Right, because I’m assuming you aren’t running a small business? If you were, you wouldn’t be able to use Fiverr! Or would you? That’s my question…


#16

Reply to @jraitchi:



If you click on OldBittyGrandma’s name you’ll discover she has quite an impressive small business. She runs it on Fiverr.


#17

Depends on what you’re doing… some businesses will work… Others wont :slight_smile:


#18

Almost forgot - THANK you for the insights!


#19

I think the TOS wouldn’t allow users to refer to external websites - you said it yourself consumers want to have a secure platform when purchasing from sellers, and the TOS was created with this in mind.


#20

Let’s be clear. The bigger question is, what does your company provide that you cannot provide here (as you level up and get bigger gig extras) I mean as a TRS, you can sell a single order for $505 (provided you also pimp out the “Super Fast Delivery” extra at $100 as well).



So, I’d change the question.



How can I use Fiverr as a “satellite” and “alternative” ecommerce platform.



Sellers, ones who have both more and less to lose than I do, are OFTEN being invited to do business outside Fiverr. However, when you get a good thing going here, you won’t want to mess that up. Not just as a TOS thing… but also, the “supporting Fiverr” …it’s like paying an affiliate.



Finally, I disagree about the someone else will come in a swoop…



The fact of the matter is there are a goodly number of “more liberal” …largely… copycat /clone marketplaces. And they don’t have anywhere near the traffic.



Additionally, fiverr has enjoyed $5-Million in first round venture capital. Followed by $15-Million in a second round. Now if you know a little about venture capital, first…you don’t get a second round …well, a) because you don’t need it AND b) because the proof of concept is clearly being shown – even if the burn rate is still high.



SO why do I mention burn rate, well simply… Late adapters are going to find it very hard to access the capital and even if they got first round funding, if I had any influence on Fiverr Strategy, I would go into pure SIEGE warfare and up their burn big time–and if it gets even a little close to “shining” buy it out.