Fiverr Forum

Questionable Fiverr Gigs


#1

Hey guys! I’m new to Fiverr. I’m doing okay so far, but I could do better.I’d like to accept as many gigs as possible. However, I know that accepting some gigs may result in being scammed or worst getting a virus. I was wondering what are some of the Red Flags you look for before saying no to a gig? How do you know when someone’s trying to spam you or steal your information?


#2

Do you mean purchasing gigs, or selling them? The answer’s pretty much the same either way: if it sounds too good to be true, it is. No “maybe”. Additionally, if by accepting you mean selling your gigs and you’re referring to communications from possible buyers, don’t click on links or open files in unsolicited messages, and report any member who sends you any.


#3

Advice on red flags to look for in both purchasing and selling is helpful. I’m asking because although I know that Fiverr is a great online marketplace, I also heard many stories of people being people scammed. I just wanted to know what to look out for. Thanks!


#4

Reply to @bonesv: You’re welcome~ And you’re right: scammers are everywhere, and not just on Fiverr. So it’s good to be very careful when communicating with people you don’t know at all. They can sound very nice and charming, but be looking for ways to steal something from you. And definitely any time you see an offer that sounds “too good to be true” it is!


#5

I’m leery of gigs that require the buyer to provide personal passwords or offer to interact with your computer remotely.


#6

@bonesv, nowadays if you knew what’s really going on on the net, you won’t even get up in the morning. You don’t have to be that paranoid about it. If Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Richard Branson, and many more had been so scared to start their computer, they would have never arrived to where they are now (and where we are). Obviously, you have to keep your private info to yourself (that’s why they are called “private”) and have an up-to-date virus protection on your computer, and I can tell you Fiverr is not more dangerous than Walmart or Walgreens.



And don’t be afraid to

bonesv said: accept as many gigs as possible


Cheers!



John :bz

#7

Reply to @magellon: I agree.



For me, opening an attachment (sent as a message) is usually a prerequisite before I can provide a price. My virus protection is pretty superb, and all files are scanned upon download, and then again with AVG before opening (takes 10 seconds).



I’ve only ever encountered one potential threat, which was when I was browsing a site for content to proofread. However, it turned out to be a false positive.



Just make sure your passwords are secure, your email is well protected, and you have your second security layer enabled on fiverr.