Fiverr Forum

Reporting sellers who don't sell anything for $5


#1

So I’m shopping for somebody to complete a job for me, and I don’t want to create a buyer request because I’ll get flooded with responses and probably spammed, too. I’m browsing for a seller, and probably every other profile I look at doesn’t offer anything for $5 and insists on me contacting them first. No thanks. I’m so irritated with this that I want to do something about it. Does anybody know the best way to report sellers who don’t actually sell anything for $5? I considered opening a ticket with customer support, but none of the ticket categories seem to match what I’m trying to report. Any suggestions?


#2

But isn’t this going to ultimately change anyway, with all that beta pricing where sellers can price things starting at higher than $5?


#3

Sure, some sellers will have the choice to list their services starting at higher than $5. And when that feature comes out, I’m sure we’ll have a whole raft of other (and probably similar) frustrations to deal with.

But it’s not out yet, and according to the ToS in effect right now, sellers are required to sell something for $5.

But beyond the ToS, it’s just frustrating to deal with sellers who won’t specify what they’ll do. Even the ones who say, “Contact me first!” frequently don’t say on their gig descriptions what their prices are. Forgive me for being old fashioned, but I prefer up-front pricing and knowing what I’m getting into before hand.

And here’s some advice for all those contact-me-first sellers from a direct-sales salesperson: Questions are obstacles. Certainly, the person who asks the questions controls the conversation (and the sales experience), but questions also delay the sale. Every time you give the customer more to think about, and ask additional questions that delay the sale, you increase the chances that the customer won’t purchase.

So what if your service has some finer points that need to be hashed out? GET THE MONEY FIRST, DUMMIES.

If time is an issue, increase your base delivery time. Once you have the money, hash it out with the customer then. You’ve got their money - THEY’RE NOT GOING ANYWHERE.

And if you get that weird customer who throws money at you but won’t respond to your questions, that’s why we have such a tool as a MUTUAL CANCELLATION.


#4

Reply to @kjblynx: Perfect, thanks.


#5

Reply to @jamesbulls: Hi James, I see many different things that are wrong in some gigs and use this as a guide to avoid them. I actually like these hints as they are good indicators that I would not be happy with the results of a purchase.
I love the clickable link to a PDF file in your gig photo. You clearly are a pro at marketing.


#6

Reply to @misscrystal: Ah ha, thanks for the compliments :slight_smile:

I did direct sales at a very expensive, “exclusive” type gym for a few years and learned a lot about presenting and closing the sale. I apply what I can to Fiverr.

For the most part, it’s all about presenting only what the customer needs to know about the service; overcoming objections; building confidence in the customer; and getting the money while the customer is in a mood to buy.

I know it sounds greasy, but for the most part it’s just a matter of staying on topic in the gig description, showing that you can provide what the customer wants to buy, helping the customer understand the value in the service through samples and guarantees, and asking for the money.

Or said even more simply, focus on the customer’s perspective and provide great customer service.

There are plenty of sellers who think the “contact me first no matter what” approach is the way to go, but I happen to agree with you: if they don’t understand their service well enough to offer fixed prices for the most common requests, chances are they’re not going to provide the quality of service I’m looking for.