Revisions


#1

Who does them and who doesn’t? What is your reason for not doing so? Or do you do a certain amount up until a certain point? For the record I do revisions. I feel like not doing a revision on a gig a customer isn’t happy with is setting you up for negative feedback and an unhappy customer…am I right? To me that’s like saying “here is some crappy work I just threw together and you’ll have to accept it because I won’t fix it.”


#2

I offer one free revision :slight_smile:


#3

I don’t have a fixed count on revisions. All of my gigs are related to webdesign and I make sure I understand their requirements correctly before I let them order any of my gigs, so 95% of my clients never need revisions.



The trick is to agree on the final expected result beforehand using as less adjectives as possible. For example, if someone tells me ‘change the color of the menu from red to blue’ then that is what I call a good description, as opposed to ‘change the color of the menu to something good’, which is a strong negative-feedback-magnet! Don’t leave anything unaccounted, ask them questions till you are both clear on what the final product should be like. Specific instruction with lesser adjectives and more nouns make the best buyer requests :wink:


#4

Awesome. Thank you @techlunatic I ask a million and one questions haha


#5

It obviously becomes a tough life for the seller if the nature of your gigs is such that the buyer expects your creative expertise, for example in gigs like logos, business cards etc, which is when the seller has to cross their fingers until the buyer leaves a feedback because there are equal chances of it being good or bad because the output is subjective after all.



I can see that you have posted in bold letters, on your gig description, asking people to contact you before placing orders, and all I can say is ‘good luck with that’. Even I have a similar message on most of my gigs and its not that it does not work but even after mentioning in the description that I offer only one tweak per gig, still I receive requests very frequently that sound something like ‘make me a site that looks like grupon, thanks’


#6

Reply to @techlunatic: I agree , when it comes to logos or other design it’s simply a matter of taste


#7

Very true.


#8

With my family tree gig is not really a revision but maybe corrections. Working with my clients they have to tap into their memories of their relatives and as time moves along and I ask them more questions their memories kick in and they may have new information. I help people start their family trees but I also like to get them into conversations with their family members. So while they may not be revisions I do work with my clients to make sure the data is correct and they are pleased


#9

I offer one free revision :slight_smile:


#10

I don’t have a fixed count on revisions. All of my gigs are related to webdesign and I make sure I understand their requirements correctly before I let them order any of my gigs, so 95% of my clients never need revisions.



The trick is to agree on the final expected result beforehand using as less adjectives as possible. For example, if someone tells me ‘change the color of the menu from red to blue’ then that is what I call a good description, as opposed to ‘change the color of the menu to something good’, which is a strong negative-feedback-magnet! Don’t leave anything unaccounted, ask them questions till you are both clear on what the final product should be like. Specific instruction with lesser adjectives and more nouns make the best buyer requests :wink:


#11

Awesome. Thank you @techlunatic I ask a million and one questions haha


#12

It obviously becomes a tough life for the seller if the nature of your gigs is such that the buyer expects your creative expertise, for example in gigs like logos, business cards etc, which is when the seller has to cross their fingers until the buyer leaves a feedback because there are equal chances of it being good or bad because the output is subjective after all.



I can see that you have posted in bold letters, on your gig description, asking people to contact you before placing orders, and all I can say is ‘good luck with that’. Even I have a similar message on most of my gigs and its not that it does not work but even after mentioning in the description that I offer only one tweak per gig, still I receive requests very frequently that sound something like ‘make me a site that looks like grupon, thanks’


#13

Reply to @techlunatic: I agree , when it comes to logos or other design it’s simply a matter of taste


#14

Very true.


#15

With my family tree gig is not really a revision but maybe corrections. Working with my clients they have to tap into their memories of their relatives and as time moves along and I ask them more questions their memories kick in and they may have new information. I help people start their family trees but I also like to get them into conversations with their family members. So while they may not be revisions I do work with my clients to make sure the data is correct and they are pleased


#16

I offer one free revision :slight_smile:


#17

I don’t have a fixed count on revisions. All of my gigs are related to webdesign and I make sure I understand their requirements correctly before I let them order any of my gigs, so 95% of my clients never need revisions.



The trick is to agree on the final expected result beforehand using as less adjectives as possible. For example, if someone tells me ‘change the color of the menu from red to blue’ then that is what I call a good description, as opposed to ‘change the color of the menu to something good’, which is a strong negative-feedback-magnet! Don’t leave anything unaccounted, ask them questions till you are both clear on what the final product should be like. Specific instruction with lesser adjectives and more nouns make the best buyer requests :wink:


#18

Awesome. Thank you @techlunatic I ask a million and one questions haha


#19

It obviously becomes a tough life for the seller if the nature of your gigs is such that the buyer expects your creative expertise, for example in gigs like logos, business cards etc, which is when the seller has to cross their fingers until the buyer leaves a feedback because there are equal chances of it being good or bad because the output is subjective after all.



I can see that you have posted in bold letters, on your gig description, asking people to contact you before placing orders, and all I can say is ‘good luck with that’. Even I have a similar message on most of my gigs and its not that it does not work but even after mentioning in the description that I offer only one tweak per gig, still I receive requests very frequently that sound something like ‘make me a site that looks like grupon, thanks’


#20

Reply to @techlunatic: I agree , when it comes to logos or other design it’s simply a matter of taste