Seller's Misleading "Hook"


#1

I frequently see gigs with good looking banners/headers which are supposed to give a feel of designer’s professionalism but when I order I am often surprised that the final result is far from quality I see in seller’s portfolio.



Now why is that so? Is it because of Fiverr’s inadequacy of rules that do not buyer know how much each gig in seller’s portfolio cost so seller would have price point reference for quality expected or is it because of seller’s misrepresentation of professionalism?



I want Fiverr to implement some kind of portfolio transparency in terms of pricing and let buyers know the cost involved in completed design gigs.


#2

Buyers have more control of what shows up in a portfolio than the seller does. For example, when I deliver my gig to a buyer and if they don’t want their gig to show up in the portfolio, they can uncheck the portfolio box to do so.



The reason I point this out is because I believe if prices started to show up in the portfolio, buyers will prevent it from showing. Pricing between buyer and seller is probably no one else business but the two involved.



If you see something you like why not just contact the seller and ask them what was involved and what it cost. I had buyers ask me to do some extra work that doesn’t show up in the portfolio. So what you see in the portfolio doesn’t always reflect what was all involved. Best to ask than to assume.


#3

Reply to @kjblynx:

kjblynx said: Also remember that the live a samples could be from an order much higher than the simple $5 base.

I think this is exactly what @boris-yo is saying. It's 'unfair' that work that costs much more is included in a portfolio of what is presented as the $5 gig title.

The portfolio images should include the actual cost of the work shown. The entire reason they don't is to give the impression to potential buyers that they will be getting the same quality of work when they order a $5 gig.

#4

Reply to @steveeyes:

steveeyes said: If you see something you like why not just contact the seller and ask them what was involved and what it cost. I had buyers ask me to do some extra work that doesn't show up in the portfolio. So what you see in the portfolio doesn't always reflect what was all involved. Best to ask than to assume.
Why should a potential buyer be expected to have to ask if what is shown under the banner of a $5 gig is actually $5?

I understand that you're saying better safe than sorry, but if you make reservations for Stan's Seafood Restaurant, should you really have to stop by a day ahead of time to make sure they actually have seafood on the menu?

#5
boris_yo said: Now why is that so? Is it because of Fiverr's inadequacy of rules that do not buyer know how much each gig in seller's portfolio cost so seller would have price point reference for quality expected or is it because of seller's misrepresentation of professionalism?
It's because Fiverr and Fiverr sellers are intentionally trying to give the impression that the $5 gigs are of much higher quality.

It's not technically "bait and switch" because a buyer can generally put in the effort to find out exactly what they will get for $5, or rather what they will have to pay to get similar quality as what's presented in the portfolio. Quite simply, the system is designed on the principal that buyers will generally just 'assume' based on what is in front of them and place the order. Once the order is placed, it's likely that the buyer will just accept what's given to them rather than initiate a process of modifications, customer support assistance, potential cancellation and so on.

It may be considered unethical or plain old trickery, but it's really no different to having images professionally photographed and retouched to present the 'best case scenario" in advertising. How many people just go ahead and eat that McDonald's hamburger they paid for instead of demanding their money back or insisting that they be given one that looks exactly like what's shown in the ads? I'd say just about all of them. I've never seen a Big Mac that looks even vaguely similar to the ones on TV, other than the box it's sitting in.

Fiverr portfolios are Big Mac boxes, the only difference is you may be able to pay more to get one that looks like the ad.

#6

Reply to @itsyourthing:



You and the other person confirmed my suspicions. It’s like you go to food market and start picking apples. There are those who look okay and those who look very good. You expect all them to cost same price as indicated but get surprised when seller tells you that yo must pay more to get apples that look very good. Of course it is not good analogy because Fiverr provides intangible product but still I tried conveying my point.



Today it’s all about marketing and perception of product. You can package junk very nicely but in the end it is crap. We live in age of deceit…


#7

Not all profiles are entirely inaccurate or missleading however far too many people expect much more done in incredible speed and at fractional costs.



Something had to give and in the cases of those sellers they choose to deliver fast with some quality with extras money compensating them for the rush.



To use the fruit analogy boris :



A banana takes time to mature , you the buyer need the banana sooner but still want to eat a nice looking yellow one , the seller rushing is like having a large machine gas that banana into ripeness… he has to pay to run that machine and passes the cost on.

Then the customer thinks about how his banana tastes funny & costs more.



This is the world we live in today.


#8
boris_yo said: Today it's all about marketing and perception of product. You can package junk very nicely but in the end it is crap. We live in age of deceit...
Unfortunately, that's true most of the time. I believe it's because media in general has trained everyone to exaggerate. There can't just be a storm coming; it has to be an epic, potential-to-be-tragic, "storm of the century!". People don't get colds any more, they get "OMG, I am SO SICK!". A cupcake isn't "good", it's "the most amazing thing I've ever eaten!".

Even the rating system here is set to exaggeration mode - a seller's overall ratings drop, unless the buyer gives them 5-Star EXCELLENT feedback. Theoretically a seller can have a million satisfied and happy buyers and never get above a 3-Star rating. Even if the seller wants to be transparent, Fiverr makes it very difficult for things to be presented as they actually are.

@scottmcfadden, I get your point, but this thread isn't about the time/quality/pay ratio of a gig, it's about giving someone the impression that they will get a fully (genuinely) ripe banana in the same amount of time, for the same cost as the 'artificial' one.

It is the world we live in today, and it's increasingly frustrating/discouraging for people who are honest & up-front and expect the same.