Fiverr Forum

Some of these people doing gigs need to understand how to read and understand directions/ english!


#1

I understand that some of these people doing gigs are from different countries but if your going to accept a gig from someone that speaks English at least be prepared to do the gig over. I must say over all i have a good experience here but some of these guys have no business trying to communicate with people. They need a translator or something!! I had a gig done with a business car and i sent the guy a pic and said this is what i DON’T want on the card and he put it on the card!! just a lack of understanding and its not just with one person…


#2

Hahaha…Lol. Fiverr’s need translators to understand the clients requirements or they must be use google translate to do this :))


#3

for real!!! omg!! You tell them you DONT want something and they think you DO!


#4

While I do not agree with your harsh comment regarding ‘learning English’, I am able to understand your frustration, as I have had a ‘buyer’ sending me the same few emails over and over for almost 6 months now and apparently he is not able to understand the numerous replies that I have sent him. I keep trying to get him to understand that I will do the gig as soon as he places an order but he just keeps emailing me instead of ordering the gig asking me if I need anymore information from him. I have told him at least 8 times that I have everything that I need but apparently he thinks I am asking him to keep sending me the same instructions over and over. I actually have began to just ignore him altogether and I feel bad about handling it that way but even with this approach he has continued to send the same emails as before. My assumption is that the buyer is using a translator (because of the broken English in his emails).


#5

I only work with clients from here in the U.S so its not a problem for me but I can see where lost in translation may hinder a gig and the experience


#6

My best client so far ordered 4 of my gigs at once, and gave all his instructions in Hungarian :slight_smile:

Google translate came to my rescue!


#7

I have ordered from sellers all over the globe. The ones who care have been able to get there points across and to understand mine. Those that won’t work with me I don’t use :slight_smile:


#8

Reply to @amybelladesigns: Amy, tell him that you will charge him one gig for every question he makes you repeat. LOL. I am sure you already spent a lot of time just communicating with him.



Bruce


#9

Reply to @amybelladesigns: Agree that we should try to make our points without offending or generalizing.


#10

@kahunasuki There are a lot of buyers and sellers who do not speak perfect English, but with a bit of patience most issues can be overcome easily. Many of them speak several languages and are far from being stupid. It would be easy, for example, for someone to nitpick at your post and point out this “your going to accept a gig” is grammatically incorrect and your is a possessive adjective and the correct use here is You’re, which is a contraction of you are and I would not start casting stones. I personally could not care less about how someone types or speaks as long as as the gig can be completed to the satisfaction of both buyer and seller and in fact go out of my way to try and communicate with a buyer in their language if English is not their mother tongue and they are struggling to get their point across.


#11

Buyers should also follow instructions :wink:


#12

Reply to @refugeek: Wow, did the buyer even know you do not understand Hungarian?


#13

I’ve had some issues in the past with buyers whose English was barely comprehensible. I’m not sure they’re even using automated translation, because the spelling is sometimes worse than the grammar.



So while it can certainly be frustrating—and occasionally a huge time sink—to try to communicate with someone who writes very poorly in English, I remind myself that, aside from English and French, they almost certainly know more English than I could speak in their native tongue. Fortunately it’s been rare that I’ve had to communicate with someone who was obviously being difficult rather than trying his/her best with limited English skills.



Some things I’d recommend to HELP steer clear of problems:


  1. Use clear, concise language. Don’t use big words that non-native speakers are less likely to know.
  2. Avoid idioms and slang.
  3. Break up your questions or statements into a list, like this!
  4. If you can’t understand a buyer’s (or seller’s) request, tell them, and try repeating what you think they mean in your own words.
  5. If you’re frustrated, take a deep breath and come back to the message later if possible.
  6. Remember that most people aren’t trying to be difficult.

#14

Agreed!


#15

Reply to @magisworks: I don’t know. But I wrote my replies in English. Maybe he was using translation on his end too :slight_smile:

It was a bit intimidating at first, but once I figured out his needs, it wasn’t different from any other job I’ve done…


#16

Reply to @amybelladesigns: Agree that we should try to make our points without offending or generalizing.


#17

@kahunasuki There are a lot of buyers and sellers who do not speak perfect English, but with a bit of patience most issues can be overcome easily. Many of them speak several languages and are far from being stupid. It would be easy, for example, for someone to nitpick at your post and point out this “your going to accept a gig” is grammatically incorrect and your is a possessive adjective and the correct use here is You’re, which is a contraction of you are and I would not start casting stones. I personally could not care less about how someone types or speaks as long as as the gig can be completed to the satisfaction of both buyer and seller and in fact go out of my way to try and communicate with a buyer in their language if English is not their mother tongue and they are struggling to get their point across.


#18

Buyers should also follow instructions :wink:


#19

Reply to @refugeek: Wow, did the buyer even know you do not understand Hungarian?


#20

I’ve had some issues in the past with buyers whose English was barely comprehensible. I’m not sure they’re even using automated translation, because the spelling is sometimes worse than the grammar.



So while it can certainly be frustrating—and occasionally a huge time sink—to try to communicate with someone who writes very poorly in English, I remind myself that, aside from English and French, they almost certainly know more English than I could speak in their native tongue. Fortunately it’s been rare that I’ve had to communicate with someone who was obviously being difficult rather than trying his/her best with limited English skills.



Some things I’d recommend to HELP steer clear of problems:


  1. Use clear, concise language. Don’t use big words that non-native speakers are less likely to know.
  2. Avoid idioms and slang.
  3. Break up your questions or statements into a list, like this!
  4. If you can’t understand a buyer’s (or seller’s) request, tell them, and try repeating what you think they mean in your own words.
  5. If you’re frustrated, take a deep breath and come back to the message later if possible.
  6. Remember that most people aren’t trying to be difficult.