Fiverr Community Forum

Stop exploitation please

Fiverr was born like 5$ for a little service,
but today several professional companies have perceived the potential of Fiverr’s service and so they begin to exploit its users.
My experience: I’ve a Gig which deals with translation English-> Italian.
I get several proposals for translations of whole websites or very large articles, and so far anything strange.
But I often realize that, behind common accounts, there are professional companies that subcontract work, to resell it to their clients passing off it as a professional job.
It’s not legal, it’s not professional, it needs a pro-contract.
So I refuse these offers and I hope you do the same thing.

There is nothing illegal in outsourcing work through fiverr, as long as the buyer pays you the correct amount that you are asking for the project

No one refuse like that. I think you need to learn more. Fiverr was never "services in $5"
Its "services starting from $5"
Make gig extras and charge $5/one page or $5/25 lines or $5/300 words.
That’s how translation gigs work.
You have lost most of your potential buyers.
If someone ask you to translate whole website or a big project, Ask them to place multiple orders according to your prices or make gig extras to make it more clear.

There is nothing illegal about outsourcing work. You are a professional by offering the service for money…

“outsourcing work = legal” is not true.
It’s true if the primer contractor allows it: in general it must be authorized by the client and in any case is subject to very strict regulations.
Here my example:
I receive an order from a user of Fiverr asking me a translation English/Italian. I find out that this person is in reality an employee of a professional translation company, so they buy my job for $ y (subcontract) and they resell it to one of their clients for $ x*y. Do you think that the client is aware of the fact that the company has subcontracted the work? I do not think, because otherwise the client wouldn’t have turned to a professional company, but he’d be passed directly from Fiverr (paying x times less). And also do you think that this company respects the regulations/laws of his country for the subcontracting?
So I refuse this kind of Gigs. It’s only exploitation.
I prefer to preserve the real final client, even if I don’t gain money.

On “offering a service for money = be professinal” we could debate, but this isn’t the key issue.
And “outsourcing work = legal” is not true.
It’s true if the primer contractor allows it: in general it must be authorized by the client and in any case is subject to very strict regulations.
Here my example:
I receive an order from a user of Fiverr asking me a translation English/Italian. I find out that this person is in reality an employee of a professional translation company, so they buy my job for $ y (subcontract) and they resell it to one of their clients for $ x*y. Do you think that the client is aware of the fact that the company has subcontracted the work? I do not think, because otherwise the client wouldn’t have turned to a professional company, but he’d be passed directly from Fiverr (paying x times less). And also do you think that this company respects the regulations/laws of his country for the subcontracting?
So I refuse this kind of Gigs. It’s only exploitation.
I prefer to preserve the real final client, even if I don’t gain money.

Hi, I think you need to learn to read better. I said “Fiverr was born like 5$/one service…” and I know perfectly how I can now earn on Fiverr: extras, custom offer, etc… and I already made large works.
I just wanted to bring to the attention of users a malpractice.

I do more custom jobs now than $5 basic gigs. I saw fiverr at first as a way of learning my trade. I am clear on what basic gigs entail and so far have not had anyone taking the mick and I avoid those buyers who look like they might.

I invested money back into equipment and try to keep learning and developing the types of work that I am able to do. I enjoy that I do not think that you can stand still as a freelancer.

Of course you will get some people saying I dont get out of bed for less than $$ Those people generally are not the ones that are sucessful and humble in what they do.

I hope this helps

Tarnia

No one is forcing you to take on work you don’t want to, so calm down.

Read this also,
http://support.fiverr.com/hc/en-us/articles/201733273-Do-I-own-what-is-delivered-to-me-

Read the terms of service of fiverr as well ,specially the section under ownership

Sorry, but i think you don’t understand the problem.
I had already read any Fiverr’s Terms of Service as I usually do when I register…
Ownership ha nothing to do with my admonishment.
I just wanted to alert users that there are buyers who purchase our Gigs to resell them to third parties in a non-legal or misleading manner. After you are free to accept these requests, as I am free to reject them.

The terms is the contract but fiverr does allow us to add our own policies (to some extent) by adding things in our gig descriptions and extras.
You could for example state that your services are not for resellers or charge extra for a reselling/commercial license.

I agree with you,
but I’d like that is clear that is obviously legal to resell a work, when the buyer acquires ownership rights.
While it isn’t legal outsourcing when you don’t respect his terms and conditions.
This is to protect the final client, unaware of this subcontracting.

No way of knowing what sort of contract the client and the third party have between them. Especially on a site where anonymity is required by terms.

I understand the frustration. After all, why are you getting paid $5 for something that a professional is getting paid $100 for, and he’s outsourcing it to you while profiting hat $95 for not doing anything.

However. At the same time you should be looking at it as a different way. Perhaps use it as supplemental income, as a chance to improve your skills so you one day can be that professional, or just as a chance to do something you like to do and earn a little money on the side.

It’s true, it is not easy to find out,
so when I understand it I prefer to refuse this kind of requests.
I just wanted to bring to light the fact, so that users are more careful.

You understand the problem,
but I’m not absolutely frustrated.
I take only the side of final client, who is openly cheated,
so I refuse this kind of work when I understand it (it’s a moral and legal issue).
And I’d like that other Fiverr’s users make the same to avoid this exploitation.
Obviously I’ll continue to translate for honest people,
and if I do this gig, it is just for my own pleasure and not for money (I’m not interested in becoming a professional translator).

I understand what you are saying, you’re not griping about Fiverr, rather your complaint is with the buyers who may or may not be subcontracting the work, which may or may not be breaking any rules, since we do not have visibility of the contracts between each party involved. Without all the facts I think it a little harsh to label those buyers who are subcontracting work, as being somehow dishonest (by inference).

I’m not sure it is actually illegal but in any case it would be a gray area… most companies (especially large ones) subcontract out work or services. Upstream and downstream of the work flow, all sorts of different outsourced resources can, and are used.

The way to combat it here, which I’m sure you do, is offer a small subset of your work for the basic gig price and up-sell additional higher value services, using your quality of work and customer service as hooks.

You post today but you’re last delivery was 3 months ago, I think you must turn down a lot of work, and for those sellers who might rely on Fiverr income, this is not the way they can play it.

Each country has its specific rules on subcontracting, but in general the rules are very restrictive and the contractual relationship must be well documented and transparent. What do you say about subcontracting is correct, but it’s sure going through Fiverr this type of action is not legal. Afterwards it is also true that it is not easy to figure out who makes this kind of exploitation (but if you read the last 3-4 big offers that I received you can understand immediately… and it’s not only intuition).

When you said this:

“Do you think that the client is aware of the fact that the company has subcontracted the work?”

The thing is, the client does not care. They go to a bigger agency because they do not want to get involved with hiring anyone directly. There is a lot of risk in trying to hire your own translator than going with a bigger company that has a good reputation.

This is how the whole world of professional advertising actually works. Let’s say a business owner wants to make a commercial for their business and run it on TV. They go and hire an ad agency to make it for them. They pay the ad agency and the agency subcontrcts out all the work, they hire the writier, the actors, the video person, the editor, and all of thoes things.

Now a business owner could if they want to, go hire a writer themselves, hire a video person, hire their own actors, and do all of the work directly for a little bit of savings on the money.

But most business owners do not know how to do all of that. They rely on the ad agency to be an expert and skilled on those function so they are essentially paying for the service and time of the ad agency to handle it all for them.

It’s the same concept with any industry and is normal. There is nothing illegal about it, as long as the person buying the work from you, pays your fee properly. But you can choose not to do that kind of work is you do not want to do it, it is up to you.

However, keep in mind that you may not always know if someone is reselling your work. But since on Fiverr, once someone pays for the gig and it is completed the rights get transferred to the buyer then they can do whatever they want with it legally.

I’m also a translator and I love resellers. More work for me!!
Who cares whether my buyers resell my work or through it out of the window? As long as they keep on buying, I’m happy.

Regarding it being legal or not, the problem is not mine, but between the reseller and the final client, and it depends on their own agreement (which I don’t have access to). If my work is proofread by the agency to check if it meets the quality standards that their clients have paid for, I don’t think it’s illegal.