The Customer is Not Always Right


#1

Hi All! They say that ‘the customer is always right’. Do you agree? The spirit of this saying is that it’s good business to try to do everything to make them happy and treat them as if they’re right… even if they’re wrong, hahaa. I however, disagree with this.



For the most part, 99% of customers are reasonable… but for that 1% who are aloof, beyond-demanding, mentally unstable, etc. - how do we deal with them? These people can’t read/follow the description instructions, want us to deliver the world, have no concept (or care) of our time put into it, and want it delivered for $4 or less.



Anyway, in this world of good guys & evil-doers, smarties & fools… I think that the customer is definitely not always right.



*What are your suggestions for dealing with customers like these?



Thanks in advance!

Jimmy


#2

I’m brand new. I’ve only had one order. I think he was happy but didn’t leave feedback. So, with my wealth of experience lol, if it’s just 1% for you, I guess it might be better to cancel and focus your energy on the 99%.


#3

thanks for your reply!


#4

I agree with you jimmy.

I also had to face few troubles because of those kind of buyers few weeks ago.



as well as I learnt some lessons from those buyers.



#. ALWAYS WE CAN NOT HOPE 100% GOOD, HONEST, RESPECTFUL PEOPLE FROM THIS WORLD. SO, WE SHOULD HAVE AN ABILITY TO WORK WITH ANY KIND OF PERSON WITHOUT HAVING TROUBLES. & i think that’s the talent…!

#. the other thing is WE CAN NOT MAKE HAPPY ALL THE PEOPLE IN THIS WORD ALWAYS.

but, always we should try to give our best out-put for the buyers.

thanks… :wink:


#5

@jimmysandiego: I guess with more publicity for fiverr.com, more people will come to buy. With more people coming to buy stuff, we get more chance of hooking a “special” buyer that can’t be satisfied whatever we try. First thing I do before even reaching this kind of client, is putting in my description that I can always refuse any assignment.



When it really comes to that point where I’ve been ordered a gig from a “special client”, (which hasn’t happened on fiverr yet because I’m new here, but I’ve seen it in my offline businesses lots of times.) I just stay calm and explain everything in detail and I even do this multiple times. By doing aforementioned, there’s much more chance of reporting the problem to support with a good end result.



That’s what I think about it. I don’t say, it’ll always work but the more “support” can see you did all you could do, to sort things out, the more they’ll be willing to help you out.



greets,


#6

thanks for your thoughtful advice… i appreciate it!


#7

Hi. From my experience on Fiverr I can tell you that yes customers are always right along with its ups and downs. If you would go by thinking otherwise you will be left with scars (badratings) which eventually will affect your flow of orders. In the end if you are not a super seller with a lot of orders in queue to generate consistent revenues for you and fiverr, you will be the one talking it out with the buyer to have the bad rating he left removed.


#8

Reply to @kjblynx: Hmmm…I wouldn’t exactly call it an “excuse” if the sign contradicts the register.



But I agree overall. Be respectful and clear. Don’t give in to bullying. When they ask for extras not included in the gig, say that you’d be happy to do it so they should go ahead and order the gig extra listed. Politely, of course. That way there’s no ambivalence about the costs.


#9

I just had one of these gigs and there’s good advice here already. From my experience on this last gig it took 108 messages back and forth before I was able to draw out clear communication of what the buyer actually wanted. In this case they knew what they wanted they were just having difficulty communicating what they wanted clearly. Once we “broke through” the communication barrier everything went well and I delivered the gig to responses of how much they love it. Also it wasn’t a $5 gig it was $105 so I was highly motivated to find a solution!



What it really comes down to is if it’s worth it for you to put the time in to fix that special case.


#10

agreed! I don’t follow that mantra of “the customer is always right”. I stay away from superlatives, like “always”. Personality definitely plays a role in this, since it’s not really about a transaction, but about two people (you and them) communicating. I agree with you that most people, 99% it feels like, are respectful and polite and such. For the others who bug you as a buyer, move past them quickly…if you can do so politely. The key word is “quickly”, of course, since you can easily get pulled into an argument over what went wrong and who’s fault it was.



I sometimes get pulled into some of these and realized it drains my energy and distracts me from servicing clients who don’t treat me this way. Best advice…get rid of them and move on to other things (for your own sanity).


#11

thanks all! some really good suggestions. i think the take home message is to pick-and-choose, while minimizing the negative experience


#12

Rule about perfect customer is not correct, for sure. You should pay attention to them, but also demand for respect to yourself. As I wrote earlier today - nobody(though maybe not nobody but most of customers) like dealing with weak-charactered sellers, they don’t feel serious business flow then. So be just decent, honest and fair. If a customer isn’t right - just ask customers support to help. Give reasonable arguments and you’ll be a winner:)