Fiverr Forum

Tips on Making a Video for Your Gig?


#1

If this is in the wrong section, please move sheriffs. I was just wondering if sellers who have videos on their gigs have any tips to make one great? I am going to add videos to my top selling gigs and was hoping for some words of wisdom. Thanks!


#2

Use your video to promote your gig. Just like you use bold, highlight, italics, and text size to catch a potential buyer’s attention, you should do the same with a video. Just because you don’t have expensive software doesn’t mean you can’t have an awesome pwnage promo video.


  1. Use some upbeat, catchy music (or one that suits your video speed, transitions, tone you want to portray, etc).
  2. Utilize font type and color for maximum LOOK-AT-MY-GIG-age.
  3. Use your video to showcase what makes your gig unique. Is it the unparalleled experience you have over everyone else? Is it the delivery speed or exceptional customer service?
  4. Take the time to craft out an eye-catching script before you record or edit your video. Brainstorm. What would catch YOUR eye if you were looking for a gig like this?
  5. And of course, most importantly, explain your gig. Pretend like your gig description doesn’t exist (because some buyers might only look at your video). In the limited amount of time you have for your video, what are the most important points about your gig?

    One video I REALLY like is by mrevilhairday. It’s creative, unique, and unparalleled. He has music that fits really well, gives his viewers a taste of what to expect during the process, and showcases his work.

    http://fiverr.com/mrevilhairday/do-a-very-special-bean-caricature-of-you



#3

Thank you @kjblynx and @rinchan86. I am wondering if maybe I could purchase a gig from someone on Fiverr and have them make my videos? I am just not any good with videos…


#4

Hi @alb8475,



Both @kjblynx and @rinchan86 have given you good advice.



You can make pretty decent videos with your smartphone, with the right apps.



One thing you will need to get right is your audio. People will, for the most part handle poor to average video quality, but they will not suffer audio that makes them wince.



If you plan on doing a face to camera, just imagine that you are speaking to one person, perhaps a best friend or family member. It will make you come across more natural.



Good luck



Mark