Fiverr Forum

Tired of being burned


#1

I spent over a week working with two programmers that wasted my time. One guy accepted the gig and disappeared. The second guy that accepted the gig, took four days broke my site multiple times. Accused me of breaking it, when he discovered an error of mine, I thought it hurt him from working. He assured me that the site was fine and I paid the guy like a fool while being on the road. Now im out of my money and my site is broken. I’ll have to pay someone locally big bucks to undo this mess.


#2

Sorry to hear about this. Such an awkward situation.
You should keep a backup before handover the site to your seller. You can ask refund from your 1st seller. Contact your hosting, many of them keep a scheduled weekly backup. Do you think seller make this mess? Ask him to redo that stuff. If conversation not work you can open a ticket to Fiverr support.


#3

Did you not have any backups?


#4

In fairness, it sounds like you don’t really know what you are doing.


#5

There are plenty of awesome and knowledgeable developers on this platform, but you need to do your research to find them.

  • If you need help with a bigger project then you should interview your developer. Ask the basic what, why and when :wink: You should understand what you’re getting for your money.
  • Make sure you know your rights in case something goes wrong. You should know when you can ask for a refund and when you’re not eligible for it.

PS: A professional developer would have started with a backup, but you should always have a second copy before you give access to someone else.


#6

I’m sure it many competent people who do great work. I unfortunately didn’t find anyone. The guy has since blocked me, so no chance to even ask for a refund. Thankfully I am an intelligent person. I did back my site up and I spent some time researching this issue. I watched a few videos on php and made two plugins that did the job and it took only a hours. I’m sure if I had an experienced coder, it would have only taken a few minutes. Lesson learned if you want something done RIGHT do it yourself. Thanks for all the help from those with constructive advice and comments and I will be opening a ticket to fiverr support to get a refund. Next time I’ll stick to having articles written and not code.


#7

He most certainly made the mess. I restored the back up and everything was back to normal. I had a number of forms that performed a few actions when the user submitted the form. When this guy got on to my site, the forms stop working. The site on a few occasions during the project would not even load. when I was given the site back, all permission had been removed and the forms did not work. But as you can see below all is well now. I replaced my backup, I learned to place a few lines of code in a plugin and tada all is working and I have added the ability to limit my users to a certain number of form entries per form. Thanks for the help and I will be contacting support, the seller has prevented me from contacting him.


#8

Ask for a refund within the order page


#9

How unprofessional, unless you were harassing or abusive to him.


#10

Another lesson is avoid doing any development work on a live site unless you absolutely have too. Do that stuff on a secure offline or online clone. Then just implement the changes once they have been properly tested.


#11

Good idea. When you have an online clone do you simply block the search engines from indexing it? Or is there more to do to prevent people from seeing it? Since it is a clone, how to keep search engines from penalizing the actual site for having a clone?

How do you keep a clone site offline?


#12

theres always going to be some sort of risk getting someone you don’t know working on your site. And there could be a number of reasons a site can go down. i assume it was a wordpress website you have and he was editing some php code. if there is a single mistake in the php code the whole site could throw an error.

Its also very easy for a developer to make excuses for errors unless you have another developer who can give second advice.

anyway glad you had a backup


#13

I keep my online clones on a non public server. If your on shared hosting or for other reason have to keep the clone on the same server then a simple way to block access to the clone is simply keeping the clone in a password protected folder.


#14

So then you could see the code but how would you see what the site actually looked like? Would anyone going to that URL see a message that they do not have access?

So how would you see it then as it would appear? Would a box pop up that asks for the password when they go to the site’s URL?


#15

Yep there is a username and password popup, once entered you can see the site normally. Without the password the site wont load at all


#16

Thank you so much for this information!


#17

If you’re using Wordpress then you can use a plugin. Some premium themes like Elementor have these built in.


#18

How do search engines handle these under construction pages or is there built in code that tells them not to index them? Does the site get penalized when it goes live if this shows first?


#19

On the hosting it is usually a copy on a subdomain that uses a copy of the database and the folders, and has to be put into “maintenance mode”, with access granted to specific users.
Eventual unauthenticated users will see a maintenance page.

Offline it can be a copy running on development enviroments like XAMPP, or on a virtual machine (VirtualBox and the like).


#20

If you’re doing a temporary maintenance then simply enable maintenance mode, do your changes and turn it off again. However, if you’re rebuilding a site and it will take days to do it, then you should clone it.

For example:

  • yourdomain.com (live server that your clients can still use while you work in a staging area)
  • staging.yourdomain.com (staging area where you have the clone that you can play around with)

Basically you have a subdomain that is not indexed when you have the maintenance mode on.