Fiverr Forum

TRS Perks, TRS Perks Lost, Other Stuff (Separated from other thread)


#1

Oh, come on… most of us have been doing just fine getting paid in 14 days. You keep bringing this up, over and over again, as if it’s a horrible thing to have to stoop down to. Show a little respect for once. This is the only payment format most Fiverr sellers have known. And there’s absolutely nothing wrong with it. Nothing whatsoever.

You’ve been bitter for six months now. It’s time to find solutions, instead of wallowing in the past. Life changes. Business changes. Learn to adapt, stop complaining, and find ways to be successful under the new rules.

So… you’re complaining because you can’t coast anymore?

Your “work ethic” leaves something to be desired.


Losing Top Rated Seller after 4 years because of 89% reply's
Losing Top Rated Seller after 4 years because of 89% reply's
#2

For many of us, getting paid in 7 days is a HUGE perk. It means that if I have $200 in credit card debt, I can pay it back in 7 days. It’s wonderful when your money clears fast.

My brother-in-law is a contractor, he would never accept payments in 14 days, he gets paid in 3 days.

I am offering someone advice about what might happened, based on my experience. That seller is grateful, he actually messaged me for a private conversation.

As for “solutions,” I have an interview at the Supermarket on Friday, so please don’t lecture me about solutions. This is not the life I wanted, but I have no choice thanks unfair demotions.

I was never coasting. I provided quality, got great reviews, delivered ahead of schedule, and more orders followed.

My glorious reviews speak for my work ethic, there are thousands of clients that have loved my work.

Work ethic, don’t make me laugh. I am BETTER than those jerks in the real world. I deliver in 3-days, they take weeks and keep asking for extensions. I even offer one free revision, I know people that don’t even do that. I provide great work for a great price, yet you dare to judge my work ethic?

If it wasn’t a huge deal, it wouldn’t be offered as a perk. Imagine if I went to McDonalds and told them I’ll pay for the burger in 14 days, they would laugh in my face.

On Lyft/Uber, you can do a direct deposit as long as you have more than $5. Some do it at the end of their shift, some let it accumulate.

One I get a full time job, I’ll let me Fiverr money accumulate, then I’ll withdraw when it’s a big amount like $1,000. But for now, I need money every week, and the 14 day waiting period is hurting me financially. If it wasn’t for my other sources of income, I’d be toast.


#3

Your lack of humility also leaves something to be desired.


#5

It’s called SELF-CONFIDENCE and BELIEVING IN YOURSELF. Besides, you’re not exactly humble.

Don’t know what you mean by that. Care to explain?

Hijacking the thread is when you change the topic of the thread. Me and others didn’t do that, we stayed topical and for some reason, a few people don’t like it.

Here’s an idea, if you don’t like a thread, comment on another thread. I for one don’t care about the World Cup and ignored those threads as much as possible. I’m just glad the World Cup is over, now we can focus on real stuff that matters.


#6

Yes, it is great when things have a clearly defined start and end so that they don’t drag on with the same comments being repeated on a monthly basis ad infinitum.


#7

Were they the same? :thinking: I just skim them anymore. :grimacing:


#8

Interesting… Did you apply for a Management position, Janitor, Cashier or :shopping: Bagger?

I always liked shopping at Publix as opposed to Winn-Dixie.

Hopefully, you WOW the interviewer.:ok_hand:t4:


#9

Indeed. If you had self-confidence, you would have taken the wonderful advice that many of us here on the forum have given to you over these past six months, and you would, very likely, be in a much better place here on Fiverr. But you didn’t take our advice, and when you did, it was more of an “eh, it won’t work, but I guess I’ll try it for three days, just to make you guys happy” sort of thing.

That is, most definitely, not a self-confidence response.

If you believed in yourself as much as you claim, then you wouldn’t have been complaining bitterly (and unendinly) for six months, while doing nothing to change your freelance strategies. New sellers that have started selling within the past six months have been doing better than you. Perhaps that can provide some insight that you can learn from.

I beg to differ. I am not complaining about being “rudely” cast off by Fiverr via demotion from TRS (or any level for that matter – and yes, I have experienced more than one demotion under the new rules… just as most sellers have). I am not complaining about things that I can control and improve (but don’t want to, like you).

Your success is all about your state of mind. The more negative your state of mind, the faster you are likely to fall from where you want to be. If you want to be successful, stop complaining, stop moaning about things you choose not to improve… and take action. Be a Doer, not a complainer. You could be wildly successful – you just choose not to be.

Truth be told, I’ve been seeing a lot of Doers succeeding lately. I am saddened by the fact that you don’t seem to want to be one of them.


#10

@Jonbaas and @fastcopywriter from what I’m reading for the past few months. I think it’s quite obvious you two are not going to be best buds. However, the :poop: mudslinging back and forth in the OP’s thread and other threads is getting ridiculous. Perhaps a PM to continue the conversation? Wait nvm that’s not going to work. Maybe a topic in the ranting pot JB :vs: FCW? :boxing_glove:

I like the both of you, you’re articulate & educated men – strong work ethics :muscle: and passionate about your work.


#11

Nah. But turning one seller’s negative perspective around to be encouragement for other sellers to take a different, positive approach to being a Fiverr seller is something that may be helpful for other sellers. The woe-is-me approach does not lead to success.

If you want to be a successful seller, complaining doesn’t help the success mindset, and choosing not to do what needs to be done… well, that doesn’t work either.

I would love to see @fastcopywriter and other sellers on this forum become successful Doers. But that doesn’t happen unless they CHOOSE to take a positive approach, and they are willing to make things happen (no matter how hard that may be).


#12

You should read “Bright-sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America”

Positive thinking is dangerous! It was leads people to buy homes they can’t afford, thinking they’ll be making more money in the future!

I am a realist-thinker, I deal with what’s happening NOW.


#13

I’ll take whatever I can get. I would love management, those people can make $70,000 a year, but I have no experience working in retail so I don’t expect to get it. I’ll probably be a bagger before they let me work the cash register.

I like Publix, but Winn-Dixie is cheaper. The interview is with Aldi, ever heard of them? They’re German chain of supermarket making inroads in America.


#14

If you’re OK with being a bagger, sounds like you’re at peace with it. Honestly, something is better than nothing. If being a :shopping: bagger generates income to pay the bills & put :spaghetti: food on the table, then so be it. Nothing to be ashamed off, really.

Yes, Aldi is my neck of the woods. :ok_hand:t4: The cashiers are really nice and they get to sit on a stool, as opposed to elsewhere. :smile:The starting pay for a cashier at Aldi in my area is $12/per hour. Which is not shabby at all! I also dig their shopping :shopping_cart: cart system with a (quarter) and when you’re done and return the cart, you’ll get the quarter back.

Well, Simon, I hope you land a fulltime job soon. I know things haven’t been a bed of :rose: roses for you. But, from everything I’ve read. You’re not a lazy man, and have been actively looking for gainful employment. :pineapple:


#15

I too am a realist. Positive thinking is deadly. The problem is, many people are so self-righteous about being positive, that they just can’t see it.

The summer before I left my last real-world job, the corrupt to his teeth CEO announced to me and over 100 other general managers that in 5-years he planned to ‘restructure’ the organization, and cut our hotel network down from 90 or so properties to 5. Everyone clapped and cheered at all the buzzwords and I was literally the only one who understood what the CEO had actually said. Namely, that in 5-years we’d all out of the job.

Of course, it didn’t help that I indulged in a bit too much wine afterward and started calling everyone brain dead, wannabe middle-class Guardian readers. 5-years later though, and guess who’s the only one not on the dole. :wink:

Sadly, no one likes a realist. I’ve tried pointing out several times how it is mathematically impossible for my cousin to ever own her house due to the interest only mortgage deal she’s signed up to. However, I just end up being told off for upsetting people.

Good luck with regard to Aldi. But be careful. Several times now I have tried injecting myself into the real world and there are 2 big problems you need to be prepared for:

  • Everyone will annoy you because in the real-world, people survive by projecting their ego everywhere. Coming from a freelance background, this will drive you nuts.
  • Secondly, it is guaranteed that as soon as you take up real-word work, your freelance career will start booming all by itself. Then you have the Catch-22 situation of: ‘Do I call in sick and/or quit?’ Or 'Do I just go out of office and focus on Aldi?'

The last time I dipped my toe in the real-world, an old man pinched my bum and I had to move towns after punching him. I’ll be keeping my fingers crossed that everything works out for you! :slight_smile:


#16

This shouldn’t be called positive thinking. It should be called gambling.
I believe that you can be a positive thinker AND a realist. You also cannot be a successful positive thinker without common sense. There is extensive science behind real positive thinking techniques. In my definition, positive thinkers have strong common sense and rather focusing on solutions than wasting their time and rambling on about how things are bad.


#17

Pretty sure there aren’t any baggers in Aldi - they are a low overhead company so they don’t even play music in the store. Along with Lidl (Aldi’s big competitor), these are my favourite places to shop for groceries. No excess, no PITA stuff, just in, out and done.

Anyway, from what I know, they are a great company to work for in many ways and I suggest you aim for assistant management there. They are generally open to people with life experience getting into management straight away. If not, go for cashier and then reapply for it in 6 months. They are all about processes, doing things “the Aldi way” and efficiency.


#18

Agree with Eoin. I have a friend who was hired as a manager in training at Aldi. She absolutely loves it and her pay is even higher than in her previous retail job in which she was the store manager. Good luck @fastcopywriter :wink:


#19

Thanks for the advice about Aldi.

I won’t deny the danger of self-fulfilling prophesies. Thinking “I will fail” and doing everything possible to ensure that outcome.

It’s easy to confuse it with gambling because every decision one takes is a gamble, specially when we don’t know what the outcome will be. There’s reason people talk of the “Wall Street Casino,” of the risks of majoring in theater vs. finance, of the 80% attrition rate among new realtors and insurance agents.

I’m not against positive thinking after taking a risk, but not before. Before one should do a careful SWOT analysis to make sure one is making a sound decision.

Maybe she thinks she’ll sell the house when she can no longer afford it, assuming the real estate market is hot by the time that happens.

Thanks for sharing your experience, it was very interesting.


#20

Somethin’ don’t line up here.


#21

What doesn’t line up? This was my original quote:

Getting paid sooner means being able to meet your responsibilities sooner. Imagine this, I offer you a job for $100,000 a year in an expensive city like New York. Then I tell you that I’m only going to pay you twice a year.

Which means you’ll be getting $34,606.59 (NYC has very high taxes) twice a year. What do you tell the landlord? How do you buy groceries? How do you live? You can’t!

See what I’m saying? You can’t afford that job because you have expenses. That’s why getting paid in 7 days, or even 24 hours, is better for everyone.

Getting paid in 14 days is a huge delay. The people that don’t care about it are simply making money outside of Fiverr, good for them, it’s the rest of us that are get hurt.