Would love it if I can see a quick summary of all my gigs


#1

… without having to go to “Sales” and then “My Gigs.” In fact, I wish I didn’t have to navigate so much on the site. Too much clicking! Have more drop down menus? Or more hover-over popups?


#2

Agree!



At least have a normal paged navigation, rather than “load more”.

Many web-developers (even Google) accepted that infinite pages are not always the best option for every site or even for the same site viewed in different devices.

Continuous scrolling has a number of disadvantages:



(below text was copied from designshack.net)

Page loading time increased: It’s obvious that the extra content to be appended at the bottom of a page needs more time to be downloaded. Users with dial-up connections or poor mobile data plans will have a reduced ability to browse effectively that page.

Memory usage: Browsers, both on desktop computers as well as on mobile devices and tablets can potentially run out of memory and crash, specially when the page loads tons of images.

The increased loading time together with more system memory required and processor usage could inevitably result in choppy, jumpy unpleasant navigation.

Browser compatibility: Since infinite scrolling belongs to the realm of responsive web design, it depends on libraries and plugins that may not be fully compatible on older devices or browser versions.

Both seeing the footer disappear and being unable to reach can be a “traumatizing” experience for the user. Also, all the content of the footer, and therefore, the function of the footer itself will vanish.

Lack of orientation and spatial reference: In a paginated scheme users can set a simple visual reference to orient themselves through the content of the page and mark the places where something of interest is found, so it’s possible to quickly return there later. There could be users who feel lost or confused not knowing where they really are or missing what they were looking for.

Loss of the user’s last position in the stream of data, when the refresh or the back button is pushed. Since the infinite scrolling aims to show large amounts of entries, it should be implemented also a way to retrieve the actual position in the list, to avoid frustrating situations. Most of complaints against endless pages refer to these two last points as the users were losing control over the page they visit.

Bookmarks tend to be useless since a point of interest won’t be marked on a discrete page but floating somewhere in the flow of entries.

While it’s not necessarily a bad thing, rankings could vary greatly on search pages since those results confined after page number 2 will then appear on page number one just by scrolling down long enough.


#3

I agree, I have several gigs and when someone asks for a quote on a piece of work I often have to check them to remind myself of the extras I’m offering, which currently involves going through the process of opening my sales page in a new tab, finding the gig I need and opening it to check. It would be great if there was a hover pop-up with the gig summary!


#4

lynx, you beat me to the punch.

Thank goodness it’s so easy to run a website with hundreds of millions of pages which are constantly changing that everyone knows a better way to do it.


#5

Call me a whiner because I haven’t had nearly as much time using Fiverr as you veterans, but I’m sure Fiverr could include a simple hover-over pop-up gig summary in the works soon? The site as I see it and use it now just doesn’t maximize user-friendliness to me, especially when someone climbs the ranks and has to do more and more orders per day. (I can nickname the website “Clickrr” because of how many times I have to click to get to the right page!) Also, the gig screen that I am sent to when I click my profile name shows that some of my gigs are “new arrivals.” That seems confusing and wrong, given that I posted those gigs over a month ago but haven’t gotten any sales on them yet.



Again, call my a whiner! :smiley: :-((


#6

@themuslimgig We can whine in 2-part harmony~!

I look at it this way: Fiverr is a relatively new (about 4 years old) site with millions of members, most of whom are running up to 30 gigs which are constantly in flux. And it grew very, very quickly. I’m sure we all have websites we enjoy visiting because of how easily they can be navigated or searched or personalized, and we all like different features! So yeah, there are features of Fiverr I might dislike but which you love, and vice versa. I would just rather view Fiverr’s positive aspects than focus on the negatives. I’m more of a “glass-half-full” person, anyway~ (*)