Writing fan fiction stories


#1

Hello to those viewing these forums. Currently, I’m a new user to the site that needs some guidance on how to get the most from Fiverr to attract clients. Is the current presentation for my gig workable? The gig itself is getting hits yet there haven’t been any client requests so far. If anyone out there is interested in giving their advice, please let me know. Thank you.


#2

I would probably suggest having more than one gig for buyers to choose from. Also, provide samples. It need not be big (it could range from size of a drabble to oneshot.). The reason is people want to be really sure what they are buying. There have been bad egg buyers/sellers that made gigs skeptical for some folks so samples help reassure buyers. =)


#3

I’d be little iffy about it personally, just because you can be held liable for making money off of a copyrighted show, movie, book, etc. Fan fiction isn’t usually a problem to the original creators until money is being being made off of them, and while some are willing to ignore it as a form of free advertising, others aren’t so nice. Disney is weirdly back and forth on it, allowing art like Karen Hallion’s but threatening a daycare for having similar characters in a mural on their building in the late 80s.

In terms of improving your gig, as a fanfic writer you’ve got access to fans at your finger tips. If you use AO3, you add a link to the end of a story or in your profile or if you use ff.net, theres your profile again, or the forums. Deviantart groups, live journal, so on and so forth.

For your gallery, perhaps put together a fancy, pretty shot of a sheet of paper, or a screen shot of your document, zoomed in as you’re still finishing a sentence. Fan fiction is something that a lot of people feel passionate about, and a high energy, fun looking gig will attract them.

Remember to clearly state how much you will provide for that $5 gig. Perhaps the basic offer should be a 500-1000 word drabble, then have gig extras or packages to extend on that.

Hope this is helpful, good luck!


#4

Fiction is a tough sell sometimes. Most of the people who make the best money at it on Fiverr do ghostwriting for people who want to publish a novel on Amazon but lack the time or skills to write it. Unfortunately those buyers aren’t likely to be interested in fanfic because of the legal issues. If they can’t make money off of it themselves, they don’t have a need to buy it.

I agree with @blackwhiskey that one of your great resources is other fans, though. If any of them just want to read fanfic in a particular genre but run out of material, they might buy just to read. I suppose their might even be a market for ghostwriting for fans too. If they can’t sell it but love it, they might want to publish yours on fanfic sites if you let them put their names on it. As long as you are very clear that you don’t endorse illegal use of the work, it might be worth a try.